Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From paveō(tremble or quake with fear).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pavor m ‎(genitive pavōris); third declension

  1. The act of trembling, quaking, throbbing or panting with fear.
  2. Fear, alarm, terror, fright, panic.
  3. Fear through expectation, dread, thrill, anxiety, trepidation.

InflectionEdit

Note that there is an old nominative singular form pavos for pavor. Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative pavor pavōrēs
genitive pavōris pavōrum
dative pavōrī pavōribus
accusative pavōrem pavōrēs
ablative pavōre pavōribus
vocative pavor pavōrēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese pavor, from Latin pavor, pavōrem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pavor m (plural pavores)

  1. intense fear, dread

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pavōrem, singular accusative of pavor. It may be a semi-learned term in its current form, preserving the intervocalic 'v' unlike other non-Iberian Romance cognates (cf. however the inherited Old Spanish paor); descendants of Latin metus (e.g. Spanish miedo) were the primary words for "fear" on the Iberian peninsula. See also the dialectal pavura, with a change of suffix as with Italian paura.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pavor m ‎(plural pavores)

  1. fright, fear

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.scribd.com/document/158436269/Diccionario-Critico-Etimologico-castellano-MI-RI-Corominas-Joan-pdf