Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin murus.

NounEdit

murus ‎(plural muri)

  1. wall
  2. (palynology) A pattern-forming ridge on the surface of a pollen grain.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Latin *moerus, *moiros, from Proto-Indo-European *mey- ‎(to fix, to build fortifications or fences), see also Latin mūnīre ‎(to protect), Old Norse -mæri ‎(border-land, boundary), Old English mære ‎(landmark, border, boundary)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mūrus m ‎(genitive mūrī); second declension

  1. a wall

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mūrus mūrī
genitive mūrī mūrōrum
dative mūrō mūrīs
accusative mūrum mūrōs
ablative mūrō mūrīs
vocative mūre mūrī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • murus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • murus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • MURUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • murus in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to throw oneself from the ramparts: se deicere de muro
    • to scale the walls by means of ladders: positis scalis muros ascendere
    • the battering-ram strikes the wall: aries murum attingit, percutit
    • to drive the defenders from the walls: murum nudare defensoribus
  • murus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • murus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
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