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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mūsculāris in the 17th century.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmʌs.kjə.lə/, /ˈmʌs.kjʊ.lə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmʌs.kjə.lɚ/, /ˈmʌs.kju.lɚ/

AdjectiveEdit

muscular (comparative more muscular, superlative most muscular)

  1. Of, relating to, or connected with muscles.
    • 1912, Edgar Rice Burroughs, A Princess of Mars, chapter 2
      It was an effort of the mind, of the will, of the nerves; not muscular, for I could not move even so much as my little finger, but none the less mighty for all that.
  2. Brawny, thewy, having strength.
  3. Having large, well-developed muscles.
  4. (figuratively) Strong, robust.
    • 2014 June 9, Samanth Subramanian, "India After English?" (blog post), nybooks.com:
      Future prime ministers may struggle to replicate the sort of muscular countrywide support that Modi was able to earn.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

CatalanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

muscular (masculine and feminine plural musculars)

  1. muscular

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūsculāris.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

muscular m, f (plural musculares, comparable)

  1. muscular (of or relating to muscles)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūsculāris.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

muscular (plural musculares)

  1. muscular (of, relating to, or connected with muscles)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit