See also: Muss, müss, muß, and Muß

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mʌs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Etymology 1Edit

Related to mess (disorder).

VerbEdit

muss (third-person singular simple present musses, present participle mussing, simple past and past participle mussed)

  1. (transitive) To rumple, tousle or make (something) untidy.
    The old man affectionately mussed his grandson's hair.
Usage notesEdit
  1. In typical usage, the direct object of this verb is almost always the hair on an individual's head, especially but not exclusively the shorter hair of a man or boy. Less frequently, it can refer to other intimate appurtenances such as clothing, bedding, mascara or other makeup on an individual's face, or a collection of belongings that previously had been deliberately arranged or put in order. In these cases, the phrasal verb construction muss up is often used instead of muss. In most other contexts, mess (or mess up) would be more idiomatic.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

muss (plural musses)

  1. A mess (disagreeable mixture or confusion of things; disorder)
  2. (obsolete) A scramble, as when small objects are thrown down, to be taken by those who can seize them; a confused struggle.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compare Middle English mus (a mouse). See mouse.

NounEdit

muss (plural musses)

  1. (obsolete) A term of endearment.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

muss

  1. first/third-person singular present of müssen

LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

muss

  1. first/second/third-person singular present indicative of mussen