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See also: Mus, mūs, and mús

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

mus

  1. plural of mu

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier mux, from French mouche (fly).

NounEdit

mus

  1. (card games) A traditional Basque card game.

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus c (singular definite musen, plural indefinite mus)

  1. mouse (animal)
  2. mouse (for a computer)

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch mussche, from Old Dutch musca, from Latin muscio, derived from musca (fly). Cognate with Limburgish mösj, Central Franconian Mösch, Mesch, Luxembourgish Mësch.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus f, m (plural mussen, diminutive musje n)

  1. sparrow

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

mus

  1. first-person singular past historic of mouvoir
  2. second-person singular past historic of mouvoir

ParticipleEdit

mus

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of mouvoir

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *múh₂s. Cognates include Ancient Greek μῦς (mûs), Sanskrit मूष् (mūṣ), Old English mūs (English mouse), Proto-Slavic *myšь (Russian мышь (myšʹ)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mūs m, f (genitive mūris); third declension

  1. mouse, rat

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mūs mūrēs
genitive mūris mūrium
dative mūrī mūribus
accusative mūrem mūrēs
ablative mūre mūribus
vocative mūs mūrēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • mus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “mus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • mus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mus in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • mus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

mùs

  1. (first-person plural) accusative form of mes.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

mus

  1. rafsi of muslo.

Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈmuːs/

PronounEdit

mūs

  1. locative of mun

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mús.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus m, f (definite singular musa or musen, indefinite plural mus, definite plural musene)

  1. a mouse (rodent)
  2. a mouse (computing)
  3. (slang) the female genitalia

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mús.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus f (definite singular musa, indefinite plural mus or myser, definite plural musene or mysene)

  1. a mouse (rodent)
  2. a mouse (computing)
  3. (slang) the female genitalia

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


NovialEdit

VerbEdit

mus

  1. (auxiliary) have to, must

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mūs f

  1. mouse

DeclensionEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mūs f

  1. mouse

DeclensionEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs.

NounEdit

mūs f

  1. mouse

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

mus m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) card game that is very popular in Spain

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish mūs, from Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s (mouse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus c

  1. mouse; small rodent of the genus Mus; especially species Mus musculus
  2. (computing) a computer mouse; an input device
  3. (colloquial) a pussy; female genitalia

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

animal
computers

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


UnamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Algonquian *mo·swa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus anim

  1. elk, moose

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mús from the Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *mūs-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus f (definite singular musa, plural mösser or myster, definite plural mössren or mystren)

  1. (rodent) a mouse

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit