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See also: Negus, neĝus, and négus

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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Named from Colonel Francis Negus (died 1732), its creator.

NounEdit

negus (countable and uncountable, plural neguses)

  1. A drink of wine, lemon, sugar, nutmeg and hot water.
    • 1857, Anthony Trollope, Barchester Towers, Volume the Second, page 177 →ISBN
      And when he got home he had a glass of hot negus in his wife's sitting-room, and read the last number of the “Little Dorrit” of the day with great inward satisfaction.
    • 1929, M. Barnard Eldershaw, A House Is Built, Chapter VII, Section vi
      Esther began [] to cry. But when the fire had been lit specially to warm her chilled limbs and Adela had plied her with hot negus she began to feel rather a heroine.
    • 1982, TC Boyle, Water Music, Penguin 2006, p. 258:
      ‘I could sure use a cup of negus and maybe some hot soup,’ he sniffs.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Amharic ንጉሥ (nəguś, king).

NounEdit

negus (plural neguses)

  1. (historical) A ruler of Ethiopia or of a province of Ethiopia; specifically, the supreme ruler of Ethiopia before 1974.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 240:
      It was a Syrian merchant, Frumentius, who is credited with converting Ezana, the Negus (king or emperor) of the powerful northern Ethiopian state of Aksum.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Amharic ንጉሥ (nəguś, king).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɛ.ɡus/, [ˈn̺ɛːɡus̪]
  • Hyphenation: nè‧gus

NounEdit

negus m (invariable)

 
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  1. (historical) Title of the highest grade in the hierarchy of the Ethiopian Empire; Negus

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

negus m (plural neguses)

  1. (historical) Negus (supreme Ethiopian ruler)