Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

niht (plural nihtes)

  1. Alternative form of nighte

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *nahts, from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts. Cognate with Old Frisian nacht, Old Saxon naht, Old High German naht, Old Norse nátt, Gothic 𐌽𐌰𐌷𐍄𐍃 (nahts); also with Ancient Greek νύξ (núx), Latin nox, Russian ночь (nočʹ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

niht f

  1. night
    On niht biþ sēo ēa ġīet wlitiġre þonne on dæġ.
    The river is even more beautiful at night than in the daytime.
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, On the Seasons of the Year
      Sēo niht hæfþ seofon dǣlas fram þǣre sunnan setlunge oþ hiere upgang.
      The night has seven parts from sunset to sunrise.
  2. day (when computing spans of time)
    for tīen nihtum
    ten days ago

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • niht in Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898) An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary