Contents

LuxembourgishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

noer

  1. feminine dative of no

Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin *notāre, alteration of Latin natāre, present active infinitive of natō. Compare Italian nuotare, Romansch nudar, nodar, Romanian înota (older form nota). Was eventually displaced by nager in modern French, possibly due to its phonetic closeness with the unrelated verb below, in the second etymology.

VerbEdit

noer

  1. to swim (travel through water)

SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin nōdāre, present active infinitive of nodō.

VerbEdit

noer

  1. to knot (making something into a know)
DescendantsEdit

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

ReferencesEdit

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (noer, "to swim")
  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (noer, supplement, "to knot")

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French noir, from Latin nigrum, accusative of niger.

AdjectiveEdit

noer m (feminine singular noere, masculine plural noers, feminine plural noeres)

  1. black

NounEdit

noer m ‎(plural noers)

  1. black