English edit

Etymology 1 edit

no +‎ -s

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

nos

  1. plural of no

Etymology 2 edit

no. +‎ -s

Noun edit

nos

  1. Alternative form of nos. Abbreviation of numbers.

Etymology 3 edit

Abbreviation

Noun edit

nos (countable and uncountable, plural noses)

  1. (countable) Acronym of nitrous oxide system.
    Coordinate term: NOx
  2. (uncountable) Abbreviation of nitrous oxide (N₂O).
    Synonym: nox

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Aragonese edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin nos. Akin to Spanish nos and French nous.

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. First-person plural dative and accusative pronoun; us

See also edit

References edit

  • nos”, in Aragonario, diccionario castellano–aragonés (in Spanish)

Asturian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin nōs (we; us).

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. us (dative and accusative of nosotros/nós)

Etymology 2 edit

From a contraction of the preposition en (in) + masculine plural article los (the).

Contraction edit

nos m pl (masculine sg nel, feminine sg na, neuter sg no, feminine plural nes)

  1. in the

Catalan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from the unstressed accusative of Latin nōs (we; us), from Proto-Italic *nōs.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

nos (enclitic, contracted 'ns, proclitic ens)

  1. us (direct or indirect object)
Usage notes edit
  • -nos is the full (plena) form of the pronoun. It is normally used after verbs ending with a consonant or ⟨u⟩.
    Fes-nos una visita, si us plau!Pay us a visit, please!
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from the stressed nominative of Latin nōs (we; us); see Etymology 1. Replaced in normal usage by nosaltres. For the development of a distinction between stressed and unstressed forms of what was originally a single word, compare Portuguese nós and nos. See also the parallel development in Spanish of nosotros.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. (archaic) we
    Synonym: nosaltres
  2. (royal, majestic) we (the so-called royal we, used by a king or queen to refer to themselves in the first person)

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nos

  1. plural of no (no)

Further reading edit

Cornish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Cornish nos, from Old Cornish nos, either inherited from Proto-Celtic *noxs or borrowed from Latin nox. In either case, cognate with Breton noz, Welsh nos and Gaulish nox, all ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

Noun edit

nos f (plural nosow)

  1. night

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin nota. Cognate with Welsh nod, Irish nod, nóta and English note. Doublet of noten.

Noun edit

nos m (plural nosow)

  1. mark
  2. token

References edit

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈnos]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: nos
  • Rhymes: -os

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Czech nos, from Proto-Slavic *nosъ, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Noun edit

nos m inan

  1. (anatomy) nose
    Synonyms: frňák, čenich, raťafák
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

nos

  1. second-person singular imperative of nosit

Further reading edit

  • nos in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • nos in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • nos in Internetová jazyková příručka

Fala edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese nos, from Latin nōs (we; us).

Pronoun edit

nos m pl or f pl

  1. First person plural nominative pronoun; we
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme IX, Chapter 4: ¿Fala transerrana?:
      I nos, inda hoxii, con autonomía i tó siguimus idendu: “Vo pa Castilla”, []
      And to this day we, with autonomy and everything, keep on saying: “I’ll go to Castille”, []
  2. (Mañegu) First person plural dative and accusative pronoun; us
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme II, Chapter 2: Recunquista:
      Non poemos analizar con pormenoris estis siglos, pero tampoco se debi toleral que, sin fundamentus, se poña en duda algo que a Historia documentá nos lega sobre nossa terra.
      We can’t thoroughly analyse these centuries, but one mustn’t tolerate that, unfoundedly, something documented history tells us about our land be questioned.
Usage notes edit
  • In Mañegu noshotrus and noshotras are more commonly used as subject pronouns.
  • Takes the form -nus when used as an object pronoun suffixed to an impersonal verb form.

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese nos, equivalent to en (in) +‎ os (masculine plural definite article).

Alternative forms edit

  • nus (Lagarteiru, Valverdeñu)

Contraction edit

nos m pl (singular no, feminine na, feminine plural nas)

  1. (Mañegu) in the

References edit

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[1], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French noz, probably from Latin nostros.

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

nos pl

  1. plural of notre; our
    Nos enfants nous rendent souvent visite.
    Our children visit us often.

Related terms edit

Possessee
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine
Possessor Singular First person mon1 ma mes
Second person ton1 ta tes
Third person son1 sa ses
Plural First person notre nos
Second person votre2 vos2
Third person leur leurs
1 Also used before feminine adjectives and nouns beginning with a vowel or mute h.
2 Also used as the polite singular form.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Etymology 1 edit

From contraction of preposition en (in) + masculine plural article os (the).

Pronunciation edit

Contraction edit

nos m pl (masculine sg no, feminine sg na, feminine plural nas)

  1. in the

Etymology 2 edit

From a mutation of os.

Pronoun edit

nos m (accusative)

  1. Alternative form of os (them, masculine plural)
Usage notes edit

The n- forms of accusative third-person pronouns are used when the preceding word ends in -u or a diphthong, and are suffixed to the preceding word.

See also edit

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. inflection of nós:
    1. accusative/dative
    2. reflexive

Guinea-Bissau Creole edit

Etymology edit

From Portuguese nós. Cognate with Kabuverdianu anos.

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. we, first person plural.

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

no (interjection) +‎ s (and, conjunction)[1]

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

nos

  1. well

References edit

  1. ^ nos in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further reading edit

  • nos in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Interlingua edit

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. we
  2. us

Kashubian edit

 
Nos.

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *nosъ. Cognates include Polish nos and Czech nos.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɔs/
  • Hyphenation: nos

Noun edit

nos m inan (diminutive nosk)

  1. nose

Derived terms edit

nouns

Further reading edit

  • nos”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022
  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011), “nos”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *nōs, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥smé.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

nōs

  1. nominative/accusative plural of ego: we, us

Usage notes edit

When used in the plural genitive, nostrī is used when it is the object of an action, especially when used with a gerund or gerundive. When used in such a construction, the gerund or gerundive takes on the masculine genitive singular. Nostrum is used as a partitive genitive, used in constructions such as (one of us).

Declension edit

Number Singular Plural
Person First Second Reflexive third Third First Second Reflexive third Third
Case / Gender Masc./ Fem./Neut. Masc. Fem. Neut. Masc./ Fem./Neut. Masc. Fem. Neut.
Nominative ego
egō
is ea id nōs vōs
eae ea
Genitive meī tuī suī eius nostrī
nostrum
vestrī
vestrum
suī eōrum eārum eōrum
Dative mihi tibi sibi nōbīs vōbīs sibi eīs
Accusative
sēsē
eum eam id nōs vōs
sēsē
eōs eās ea
Ablative
sēsē
nōbīs vōbīs
sēsē
eīs
Vocative egō nōs vōs

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

See also edit

References edit

  • "nos", in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • "nos", in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Lombard edit

 

Alternative forms edit

  • nus (Modern orthography)

Etymology edit

From Latin nucem, accusative singular of nux (nut), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *knew-.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nos f (invariable) (Classical Milanese orthography)

  1. walnut (fruit and tree)
  2. (botany) nut

References edit

  • Francesco Cherubini, Vocabolario milanese-italiano, Volume 3, 1843, p. 179

Lower Sorbian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *nosъ, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nos m inan (diminutive nosk)

  1. nose

Declension edit

Middle English edit

Noun edit

nos (plural nosses)

  1. Alternative form of nose

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse nǫs, from Proto-Germanic *nasō, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Noun edit

nos f or m (definite singular nosa or nosen, indefinite plural noser, definite plural nosene)

  1. (dialectal) nose
  2. (dialectal) steep protruding point on a mountain

Synonyms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse nǫs, from Proto-Germanic *nasō, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Noun edit

nos f (definite singular nosa, indefinite plural naser, definite plural nasene)

  1. nose
  2. steep protruding point on a mountain

Synonyms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Occitan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin nōs.

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. to us (first-person plural indirect object pronoun)
  2. ourselves (first-person plural reflexive pronoun)

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Occitan nos, nous, nou, from Latin nōdus. Compare Catalan nus, French nœud, Italian nodo.

Noun edit

nos m (plural noses)

  1. knot

Old Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *nosъ, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nos m inan

  1. (anatomy) nose

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

  • nous (first-person plural subject pronoun)
  • nus (first-person plural subject pronoun)

Etymology edit

From Latin nōs.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. we (first-person plural subject pronoun)
  2. our (masculine and feminine plural possessive pronoun)
  3. to us (first-person plural indirect object pronoun)
  4. ourselves (first-person plural reflexive pronoun)

Descendants edit

Old Spanish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin nōs, in the nominative case, and accusative nōs stressed.

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. nominative of nos: we
    • between 1140-1207, Cid, 1280-1281 :
      a grãd ondr̃a vernan
      Aeſtas t͠rras eſtranas q̃ nos pudiemos ganar
      They [the Cid's wife and daughters] will come in great honour
      to these foreign lands, which we had won
  2. prepositional of nos: us
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin nōs, in the accusative case unstressed, and dative nōbīs.

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. accusative of nos: us
  2. dative of nos: to us, for us
    • between 1140-1207, Cid, 1298 :
      Qͣndo dios p̃ſtar nos qͥere nos biẽ gelo gradeſcamos
      (normalized) Quando Dios prestarnos quiere, nos bien ge lo gradescamos
      When God wants to help us, we should thank Him well for it
Descendants edit

Etymology 3 edit

Contraction of no (not) and se (him/her/itself, themselves).

Contraction edit

nos

  1. not ... (to oneself)
    • between 1140-1207, Cid, 1243-1244 :
      Myo çid don Rͦ en valençia esta folgando
      Con el mẏnaẏa albarffanez q̃ nos le parte de so braço
      My Cid, don Rodrigo, is having a break in Valencia,
      with Minaya Álvar Fáñez, who does not leave (partirse) his side
    • 1140 – 1207, Cid, 1206-1207 :
      Sonando vã ſus nue͠uas todas atodas partes
      Mas le vienen a mẏo çid ſabet q̃ nos le van
      The news of him roam everywhere
      But more men come to my Cid, mind you, than those who leave (irse) him

Papiamentu edit

Etymology edit

From Portuguese nós and Kabuverdianu anos.

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. we, first person plural.

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *nosъ, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nos m inan (diminutive nosek, augmentative nochal or nosisko)

  1. nose

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjectives
nouns

Further reading edit

  • nos in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • nos in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese nos, from Latin nōs (we; us), from Proto-Italic *nōs.

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: nos

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. inflection of nós:
    1. accusative
    2. dative
    Ele dir-nos-ia o nome do indivíduo. (Portugal)
    He would tell us the name of the individual.
    Ele nos diria o nome do indivíduo. (Brazil)
    He would tell us the name of the individual.
Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:no.

See also edit

Portuguese personal pronouns (edit)
Number Person Nominative
(subject)
Accusative
(direct object)
Dative
(indirect object)
Prepositional Prepositional
with com
Non-declining
m f m f m and f m f m f m f
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo você
o senhor a senhora
Third ele ela o
(lo, no)
a
(la, na)
lhe ele ela com ele com ela o mesmo a mesma
se si consigo
Plural First nós nos nós connosco (Portugal)
conosco (Brazil)
a gente
Second vós vos vós convosco, com vós vocês
os senhores as senhoras
Third eles elas os
(los, nos)
as
(las, nas)
lhes eles elas com eles com elas os mesmos as mesmas
se si consigo
Indefinite se si consigo

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. Obsolete spelling of nós

Etymology 3 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese nos, clipping of enos, from en (in) + os (the).

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: nos

Contraction edit

nos m pl

  1. Contraction of em os (in the): masculine plural of no
    • 2000, J. K. Rowling, Lia Wyler, Harry Potter e o Prisioneiro de Azkaban, Rocco, page 55:
      [...] o gato ronronava feliz nos braços de Hermione.
      [...] the cat was purring happily on Hermione's arms.
Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:no.

Etymology 4 edit

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: nos

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. Alternative form of os (third-person masculine plural objective pronoun) used as an enclitic following a verb form ending in a nasal vowel or diphthong
Usage notes edit
  • This form is not found in Brazilian speech.

Sardinian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin nōs, from Proto-Italic *nōs, from the oblique case forms of Proto-Indo-European *wéy (we).

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

nos (possessive nostru)

  1. we
    Synonyms: nois, nosatros
  2. us

Serbo-Croatian edit

 
Serbo-Croatian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sh

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *nosъ, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nȏs m (Cyrillic spelling но̑с, diminutive nòsić, relational adjective nòsnī)

  1. (anatomy) nose

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Slovak edit

 
Slovak Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sk

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *nosъ, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nos m inan

  1. nose

Further reading edit

  • nos”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Slovene edit

 
Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Alternative forms edit

  • noſ (Bohorič alphabet)

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *nosъ

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nọ̑s m inan

  1. (anatomy) nose
    Synonyms: kumara, nosek, nosič
  2. sense of smell
    Synonyms: voh, duh, njuh, vonj
  3. (figuratively) nose (ability to find, deduce something)
  4. nose (the tip of something)
  5. (obsolete) reprimand[→SSKJ]
    Synonym: ukor

Declension edit

First masculine declension (hard o-stem, inanimate, -ov- infix), long mixed accent, ending -u in genitive singular
nom. sing. nọ̑s
gen. sing. nosȗ
singular dual plural
nominative
imenovȃlnik
nọ̑s nosȏva nosȏvi
genitive
rodȋlnik
nosȗ nosóv nosóv
dative
dajȃlnik
nọ̑su, nọ̑si nosȏvoma, nosȏvama nosȏvom, nọ̑sȏvam
accusative
tožȋlnik
nọ̑s nosȏva nosȏve
locative
mẹ̑stnik
nọ̑su, nọ̑si nosȏvih nosȏvih
instrumental
orọ̑dnik
nọ̑som nosȏvoma, nosȏvama nosȏvi
(vocative)
(ogȏvorni imenovȃlnik)
nọ̑s nosȏva nosȏvi


First masculine declension (hard o-stem, inanimate, -ov- infix), fixed accent, special accent changes
nom. sing. nọ̑s
gen. sing. nọ̑sa
singular dual plural
nominative
imenovȃlnik
nọ̑s nosȏva nosȏvi
genitive
rodȋlnik
nọ̑sa nosóv nosóv
dative
dajȃlnik
nọ̑su, nọ̑si nosȏvoma, nosȏvama nosȏvom, nọ̑sȏvam
accusative
tožȋlnik
nọ̑s nosȏva nosȏve
locative
mẹ̑stnik
nọ̑su, nọ̑si nosȏvih nosȏvih
instrumental
orọ̑dnik
nọ̑som nosȏvoma, nosȏvama nosȏvi
(vocative)
(ogȏvorni imenovȃlnik)
nọ̑s nosȏva nosȏvi


Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • nos”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran
  • nos”, in Termania, Amebis
  • See also the general references

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Spanish nos, from accusative Latin nōs and dative Latin nōbīs, from Proto-Italic *nōs.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /nos/ [nos]
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -os
  • Syllabification: nos

Pronoun edit

nos (object pronoun)

  1. dative of nosotros: to us, for us
  2. accusative of nosotros: us
  3. (reflexive) reflexive of nosotros: ourselves; each other
    • 1998, Roberto Bolaño, Los detectives salvajes, →ISBN, page 262:
      A eso de las cuatro de la mañana todos nos dijimos buenas noches.
      Around four in the morning, we all told each other good night.
  4. (archaic, formal) first person; I (singular; compare vos)

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

nos m pl

  1. plural of no

See also edit

References edit

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse nǫs, from Proto-Germanic *nasō, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s-.

Noun edit

nos c

  1. a nose of an animal
  2. (colloquial, humorous) the (area around the) nose and mouth of a human
    Synonym: (human nose) näsa
  3. something that resembles a nose
    noshjul
    nosewheel

Declension edit

Declension of nos 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative nos nosen nosar nosarna
Genitive nos nosens nosars nosarnas

Related terms edit

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Volapük edit

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. nothing

Walloon edit

Etymology edit

From Old French nos, from Latin nos.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

nos

  1. we

Related terms edit

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Welsh nos, according to Matasovic, a loanword from Latin nox (night), but according to Falileyev, from Old Welsh nos, from Proto-Celtic *noxt-stu-, a suffixed form of *noxs (night).

Cognates include Breton noz, Cornish nos and Gaulish nox

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nos f (uncountable, not mutable)

  1. night, evening

Usage notes edit

  • Nos (night, evening) generally refers to the uncoutable period of darkness. The word is also used with the names of evenings and nights of days of the week, with holiday and festival names and in the phrase Nos da (Good night). It is therefore the opposite of dydd (day).
yn ystod y nosduring the night
nos WenerFriday evening/night
Nos GalanNew Year's Eve
  • Noson (night, evening), on the other hand, is countable and refers to an individual evening or night and so is the word used when employing a qualifying numeral or adjective. It sits in contrast to the word diwrnod (day).
noson wycha great evening/night
tair nosonthree nights
  • Noswaith (evening) is used in phrase Noswaith dda (Good evening). It is also synonymous to noson in some southern dialects.
(South Wales) tair noswaiththree nights

Derived terms edit

Terms derived from nos
  • brig y nos (gloaming; twilight)
  • echnos (the night before last)
  • gyda'r nos (at night, in the evening)
  • llwydnos (dusk, twilight, literally grey night)
  • min nos (evening, twilight, literally the edge of night)
  • nos da (goodnight)
  • noson (evening; night)
  • noswaith (evening)
  • pythefnos (fortnight, literally fifteen nights)
  • wythnos (week, literally eight nights)

Related terms edit

Terms related to the root of nos

Western Apache edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nos

  1. manzanita plant

Usage notes edit

  • occurs only in Dilzhe’eh (Tonto) dialect

See also edit