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Classical NahuatlEdit

The glyph for the day sign olīn “quake”, from the Codex Magliabechiano.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From olīni, olīnia ‎(to move, shake).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

olīn ‎(inanimate)

  1. (it is) the seventeenth of the twenty day signs of the tōnalpōhualli; a conceptual depiction of movement as two intertwining bands of color.
    • 16th c.: Codex Magliabechiano, f. 13r.
      chicume uli la / primera . silab / breue. y laul ti / ma luenga. q / quiere dezir ti / en. tienble latie / rra.
      chicume uli. the first syllab[le] short, and the last one long. which means “[seven] the earth shakes”.

Usage notesEdit

  • Similarly to cipactli, the translation of the day sign olīn varies. Andrews proposes “quake”, though “movement”, suggested by the root verb olīnia ‎(to move with difficulty), is a more common translation.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Rémi Siméon (1885) Diccionario de la lengua náhuatl o mexicana, Siglo Veintiuno Editores, page 354
  • Laurette Séjourné (1981) El pensamiento náhuatl cifrado por los calendarios, Siglo Veintiuno Editores, page 32

EstonianEdit

FinnishEdit

VerbEdit

olin

  1. First-person singular indicative past form of olla.

AnagramsEdit

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