See also: Band, bånd, and *band

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English band (also bond), from Old English beand, bænd, bend ‎(bond, chain, fetter, band, ribbon, ornament, chaplet, crown), from Proto-Germanic *bandą, *bandiz ‎(band, fetter), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- ‎(to tie, bind). Middle English band reinforced by Old French bande. Cognate with Dutch band, German Band, Danish bånd, Swedish band, Icelandic bandur ‎(band). Related to bond, bind, bend.

NounEdit

band ‎(plural bands)

  1. A strip of material used for strengthening or coupling.
    1. A strip of material wrapped around things to hold them together.
      • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 10, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
        The Jones man was looking at her hard. Now he reached into the hatch of his vest and fetched out a couple of cigars, everlasting big ones, with gilt bands on them.
    2. A narrow strip of cloth or other material on clothing, to bind, strengthen, or ornament it.
    3. A strip along the spine of a book where the pages are attached.
    4. A belt or strap that is part of a machine.
  2. (architecture) A strip of decoration.
    1. A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of colour, or of brickwork.
    2. In Gothic architecture, the moulding, or suite of mouldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts.
  3. That which serves as the means of union or connection between persons; a tie.
  4. A linen collar or ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries.
  5. (in the plural) Two strips of linen hanging from the neck in front as part of a clerical, legal, or academic dress.
  6. (physics) A part of the radio spectrum.
  7. (physics) A group of energy levels in a solid state material.
    valence band;  conduction band
  8. (obsolete) A bond.
  9. (obsolete) Pledge; security.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  10. (chiefly US) A ring, such as a wedding ring (wedding band), or a ring put on a bird's leg to identify it.
  11. (sciences) Any distinguishing line formed by chromatography, electrophoresis etc
  12. (slang, hiphop, often in the plural) A wad of money totaling $10K, held together by a band; (by extension) money
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

band ‎(third-person singular simple present bands, present participle banding, simple past and past participle banded)

  1. (transitive) To fasten with a band.
  2. (transitive, ornithology) To fasten an identifying band around the leg of (a bird).
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English band, from Old French bande, from Old Provençal banda ‎(regiment of troops), probably from Proto-Germanic *bandī or Gothic, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- ‎(to tie, bind).

NounEdit

A music band

band ‎(plural bands)

  1. A group of musicians who perform together as an ensemble, usually for a professional recording artist.
  2. A type of orchestra originally playing janissary music.
  3. A marching band.
  4. A group of people loosely united for a common purpose (a band of thieves).
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum , The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 23
      "My third command to the Winged Monkeys," said Glinda, "shall be to carry you to your forest. Then, having used up the powers of the Golden Cap, I shall give it to the King of the Monkeys, that he and his band may thereafter be free for evermore."
  5. (anthropology) A small group of people living in a simple society.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      But in the meantime Robin Hood and his band lived quietly in Sherwood Forest, without showing their faces abroad, for Robin knew that it would not be wise for him to be seen in the neighborhood of Nottingham, those in authority being very wroth with him.
  6. (Canada) A group of aboriginals that has official recognition as an organized unit by the federal government of Canada.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Cantonese: band
  • German (colloquial, "Denglish"): Band
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

band ‎(third-person singular simple present bands, present participle banding, simple past and past participle banded)

  1. (intransitive) To group together for a common purpose; to confederate.
    • Bible, Acts xxiii. 12
      Certain of the Jews banded together.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit


ChineseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English band.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

band

  1. (Cantonese) band   (Classifier: c)

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English band.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /baːnd/, [b̥æːnd̥]

NounEdit

band n (singular definite bandet, plural indefinite band or bands)

  1. band
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse bann ‎(ban, curse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

band n (singular definite bandet, not used in plural form)

  1. (rare) excommunication

Etymology 3Edit

From bande ‎(swear, curse), from Old Norse banna ‎(ban, curse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

band c, n

  1. (rare) swear word

DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

band m, n ‎(plural banden, diminutive bandje n)

  1. connection, liaison, bond m
  2. band (all English senses, above, except for group of musicians) m
  3. tire/tyre (e.g. a car tyre) m
  4. tape (magnetic tape, video tape) m
  5. bank (the bank of a pool table) m
  6. belt (a martial arts belt) m
  7. belt (conveyor belt) m
  8. ribbon n
  9. bond, tie m
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English band.

NounEdit

band m ‎(plural bands, diminutive bandje n)

  1. (music) band

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

band

  1. Past tense of binden.

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse band.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

band n ‎(genitive singular bands, nominative plural bönd)

  1. a string
  2. yarn
  3. (figuratively, in the plural) ties, connection, relations
  4. binding (of a book)
  5. (music) tie
  6. (music, slang) a musical band

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • bånd (see this word for common usage)

EtymologyEdit

From English band (in this sense)

NounEdit

band n ‎(definite singular bandet, indefinite plural band, definite plural banda or bandene)

  1. (music) a band; group of (rock) musicians

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse band.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

band n

  1. a band, a ribbon, a tape; a strip of material
  2. a band, an ensemble, an orchestra; group of musicians
  3. a band, a gang; band of robbers
  4. (physics) a band; a part of radio spectrum
  5. (physics) a band; a group of energy levels
  6. an audio tape or a video tape
  7. a cassette of audio or video tape
  8. a tie, a connection, a relation; from a person to another person or to a place

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of band 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative band bandet band banden
Genitive bands bandets bands bandens

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

band

  1. past tense of binda.
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