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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin ōstium.

NounEdit

ostium (plural ostia)

  1. A small opening or orifice, as in a body organ or passage.
  2. Any of the small openings or pores in a sponge.
  3. The mouth of a river.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with ōs (mouth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōstium n (genitive ōstiī or ōstī); second declension

  1. door
  2. entrance
  3. estuary

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ōstium ōstia
Genitive ōstiī
ōstī1
ōstiōrum
Dative ōstiō ōstiīs
Accusative ōstium ōstia
Ablative ōstiō ōstiīs
Vocative ōstium ōstia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Aromanian: ushã, ushi
  • English: ostium
  • French: huis
  • Friulian: luš
  • Italian: uscio
  • Italian: ostio
  • Ladin: usc

ReferencesEdit

  • ostium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ostium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ostium in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • ostium in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to knock at the door: ostium, fores pulsare
    • to open, shut the door: ostium, fores aperire, claudere
  • ostium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ostium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin