English edit

 
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Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English us, from Old English ūs (us, dative personal pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *uns (us), from Proto-Indo-European *ne-, *nō-, *n-ge-, *n̥smé (us). The compensatory lengthening was lost in Middle English due to the word being unstressed while being used. Cognate with Saterland Frisian uus (us), West Frisian us, ús (us), Low German us (us), Dutch ons (us), German uns (us), Danish os (us), Latin nōs (we, us).

Pronunciation edit

  • (stressed) enPR: ŭs, IPA(key): /ʌs/, /ʌz/
  • (unstressed) (US) IPA(key): /əs/, (UK) IPA(key): /əs/, /əz/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Pronoun edit

us

  1. (personal) Me and at least one other person; the objective case of we.
  2. (Commonwealth, colloquial, chiefly with give) Me.
    Give us a look at your paper.
    Give us your wallet!
    She's turned the weans against us!
  3. (Northern England) Our.
    We'll have to throw us food out.
  4. (Northumbria) Me (in all contexts).
    Look at us while you’re speaking to us.
    Could you do that for us?
Alternative forms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
See also edit

Determiner edit

us

  1. The speakers/writers, or the speaker/writer and at least one other person.
    It's not good enough for us teachers.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Derived from the similarity between the letter u and the Greek letter µ.

Symbol edit

us

  1. Alternative spelling of µs: microsecond
    • 2002, Peter Spasov, Microcontroller Technology, the 68HC11, page 489:
      ;wait 500 us
    • 2012, Peter Feiler, David Gluch, Model-Based Engineering with AADL:
      The standard units are ns (nanoseconds), us (microseconds), ms (milliseconds), sec (seconds), min (minutes), and hr (hours).
    • 2014, Michael Corey, Jeff Szastak, Michael Webster, Virtualizing SQL Server with VMware: Doing IT Right, page 198:
      Because the flash devices are local to the server, the latencies can be microseconds (us) instead of milliseconds (ms) and eliminate some traffic that would normally have gone over the storage network.

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

us

  1. (rare) Alternative form of u's.

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin vōs.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

us (proclitic and contracted enclitic, enclitic vos)

  1. you (plural, direct or indirect object)
  2. Contraction of vos.

Usage notes edit

  • us is the reinforced (reforçada) form of the pronoun. It is used before verbs.
    Si us plau.Please.
    Si no us importa.If you don't mind.
  • -us is the reduced (reduïda) form of the pronoun. It is used after verbs ending with a vowel.
    Volia veure-us.I wanted to see you.

Declension edit

Further reading edit

Central Franconian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /us/, (stressed optionally) /uːs/

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle High German ūz, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

Preposition edit

us (+ dative)

  1. (Ripuarian, parts of Moselle Franconian) out of, from
    • 1936, Inscription on the Schwarze Katz well in Zell:
      He steiht ferm wie en Zeller us dem Hamm.
      He stands firm as a Zell man from the Hamm [i.e. the Moselle bow around Zell with its steeply sloped vineyards].
Usage notes edit
  • Where it occurs in Moselle Franconian, it generally does so only in unstressed position while the stressed form is aus, ous.
Alternative forms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle High German uns, from Proto-Germanic *uns, *unsiz. Loss of the nasal is due to a sporadic development (analogous to the Ingvaeonic nasal spirant-law, but later and not systematic); compare Luxembourgish eis, Limburgish ós.

Pronoun edit

us

  1. (most of Ripuarian, parts of Moselle Franconian) Dative/accusative first-person plural personal pronoun: us
Alternative forms edit

Fala edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese os, from Latin illōs.

Alternative forms edit

  • os (Mañegu)

Article edit

us m pl (singular u, feminine a, feminine plural as)

  1. (Lagarteiru, Valverdeñu) Masculine plural definite article; the

Pronoun edit

us

  1. (Lagarteiru, Valverdeñu) Third person plural masculine accusative pronoun; them
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative forms edit

Article edit

us m pl (singular un, feminine unha, feminine plural unhas)

  1. (Lagarteiru) Masculine singular indefinite article; some

References edit

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[1], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French us, from Latin ūsus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

us m pl (plural only)

  1. (plural only) mores; traditional practices or manners

Usage notes edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

us

  1. Romanization of 𐌿𐍃

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English ūs (us, dative personal pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *uns (us), from Proto-Indo-European *ne-, *nō-, *n-ge-, *n-sme- (us).

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

us (nominative we)

  1. First-person plural accusative pronoun: us.
  2. (reflexive) ourselves.
  3. (reciprocal) each other.

Synonyms edit

Descendants edit

  • English: us
  • Scots: us, hus
  • Yola: ouse, ouz, uz, es

See also edit

References edit

Middle Low German edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ûs or us

  1. (personal pronoun, dative, accusative) Alternative form of uns.
  2. (possesive pronoun) Alternative form of uns.

Declension edit

Possesive pronoun:

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French uis, from Latin ostium.

Noun edit

us m (plural us)

  1. door

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *uns, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥s, *nes. Cognates include Old Frisian ūs (West Frisian ús), Old Saxon ūs (Low German os, ons), Dutch ons, Old High German uns (German uns), Old Norse oss (Swedish oss), Gothic 𐌿𐌽𐍃 (uns). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin nos.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ūs

  1. accusative/dative of : (to) us

Descendants edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ūsus.

Noun edit

us oblique singularm (oblique plural us, nominative singular us, nominative plural us)

  1. tradition or custom

Descendants edit

  • French: us

Old Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *uns, *unsiz. Cognates include Old English ūs, Old Saxon ūs and Old Dutch uns.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ūs

  1. accusative/dative of

Inflection edit

Descendants edit

  • North Frisian:
    Most dialects: üs
    Sylt: üüs
  • Saterland Frisian: uus
  • West Frisian: ús

References edit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

us

  1. plural of u

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *ǫsъ.

Noun edit

ȕs f (Cyrillic spelling у̏с)

  1. fishbone

References edit

  • us” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkishاوص(us), from Proto-Turkic *us (mind, reason).[1]

Noun edit

us (definite accusative usa, plural uslar)

  1. mind
  2. reason
  3. intelligence

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative us
Definite accusative usu
Singular Plural
Nominative us uslar
Definite accusative usu usları
Dative usa uslara
Locative usta uslarda
Ablative ustan uslardan
Genitive usun usların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular usum uslarım
2nd singular usun usların
3rd singular usu usları
1st plural usumuz uslarımız
2nd plural usunuz uslarınız
3rd plural usları usları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular usumu uslarımı
2nd singular usunu uslarını
3rd singular usunu uslarını
1st plural usumuzu uslarımızı
2nd plural usunuzu uslarınızı
3rd plural uslarını uslarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular usuma uslarıma
2nd singular usuna uslarına
3rd singular usuna uslarına
1st plural usumuza uslarımıza
2nd plural usunuza uslarınıza
3rd plural uslarına uslarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular usumda uslarımda
2nd singular usunda uslarında
3rd singular usunda uslarında
1st plural usumuzda uslarımızda
2nd plural usunuzda uslarınızda
3rd plural uslarında uslarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular usumdan uslarımdan
2nd singular usundan uslarından
3rd singular usundan uslarından
1st plural usumuzdan uslarımızdan
2nd plural usunuzdan uslarınızdan
3rd plural uslarından uslarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular usumun uslarımın
2nd singular usunun uslarının
3rd singular usunun uslarının
1st plural usumuzun uslarımızın
2nd plural usunuzun uslarınızın
3rd plural uslarının uslarının

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Starostin, Sergei; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg (2003), “*us”, in Etymological dictionary of the Altaic languages (Handbuch der Orientalistik; VIII.8), Leiden, New York, Köln: E.J. Brill

Tz'utujil edit

Noun edit

us

  1. fly (insect)

Volapük edit

Adverb edit

us

  1. there

West Frisian edit

Pronoun edit

us

  1. object of wy