Open main menu
See also: döör and door-

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dore, dor, from Old English duru (door), dor (gate), from Proto-Germanic *durz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer- (doorway, door, gate). Cognates include Saterland Frisian Doore (door), West Frisian doar (door), Dutch deur (door), Low German Door, Döör (door), German Tür (door), Tor (gate), Danish and Norwegian dør (door), Icelandic dyr (door), Latin foris, Greek θύρα (thúra), Albanian derë pl. dyer, Kurdish دەرگە(derge), derî, Persian در(dar), Russian дверь (dverʹ), Hindustani द्वार (dvār) / دوار(dvār), Armenian դուռ (duṙ), Irish doras, Lithuanian durys.

 
A door.
 
A wooden door

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

door (plural doors)

  1. A portal of entry into a building, room, or vehicle, consisting of a rigid plane movable on a hinge. Doors are frequently made of wood or metal. May have a handle to help open and close, a latch to hold the door closed, and a lock that ensures the door cannot be opened without the key.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly, [] , down the nave to the western door. [] At a seemingly immense distance the surpliced group stopped to say the last prayer.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘No. I only opened the door a foot and put my head in. The street lamps shine into that room. I could see him. He was all right. Sleeping like a great grampus. Poor, poor chap.’
    I knocked on the vice president's door
  2. Any flap, etc. that opens like a door.
    the 24 doors in an Advent calendar
  3. (immigration) An entry point.
  4. (figuratively) A means of approach or access.
    Learning is the door to wisdom.
  5. (figuratively) A barrier.
    Keep a door on your anger.
  6. (computing, dated) A software mechanism by which a user can interact with a program running remotely on a bulletin board system. See BBS door.

MeronymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

MeronymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

door (third-person singular simple present doors, present participle dooring, simple past and past participle doored)

  1. (transitive, cycling) To cause a collision by opening the door of a vehicle in front of an oncoming cyclist or pedestrian.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch dore, from Old Dutch thuro, from Proto-Germanic *þurhw.

PrepositionEdit

door

  1. through
    Hij schoot de bal door het raam.
    He kicked the ball through the window.
  2. across, around (within a certain space)
    Dolenthousiast rende het hondje door de kamer.
    Very enthusiastically the puppy ran around the room.
  3. because of, due to
    Door files kan ik niet op tijd komen.
    Because of traffic jams I'm unable to arrive on time.
  4. by, by means of
    Hij vermeed een confrontatie door de andere kant op te lopen.
    He avoided a confrontation by walking the other way.
InflectionEdit
SynonymsEdit

(because of):

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

door

  1. through
  2. forward, on
    Ondanks slecht weer ging het feest toch door.
    Despite bad weather, the party went on anyway.
  3. (postpositional) through (implying motion)
    Ik rijd nu de stad door.
    I'm now driving through the city.
  4. (postpositional) across, around (within a certain space)
    Dolenthousiast rende het hondje de kamer door.
    Very enthusiastically the puppy ran around the room.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch dôre. Cognate to German Tor. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

NounEdit

door m (plural doren)

  1. (now Southern, archaic) fool, moron
    • Frans de Cort.
      Past ook op uwe ooren / Beter dan de doren!
    Synonyms: dwaas, nar, zot
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dolor (pain), dolōris.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

door f (plural doores)

  1. pain
    • 13th century, Afonso X the wise, Cantigas de Santa Maria, E Codex, Cantiga 206:
      ⁊ untou lle bẽ a chaga / ⁊ perdeu Log a door. / ⁊ poſſ el a ſua mão. / ben firme en ſeu logar
      And anointed well the wound / and soon the pain was gone. / And put his hand / very firmly in its place.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SomaliEdit

VerbEdit

door

  1. to choose