panacea

See also: Panacea

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin panacēa, from Ancient Greek πανάκεια (panakeia), from πανακής (panakēs, all-healing), from πᾶν (pan, all) (equivalent to English pan-) + ἄκος (akos, cure).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

panacea (plural panaceas or panaceæ)

  1. A remedy believed to cure all disease and prolong life that was originally sought by alchemists; a cure-all.
  2. Something that will solve all problems.
    A monorail will be a panacea for our traffic woes.
  3. (obsolete) A particular plant believed to provide a cure-all.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.v:
      There, whether it diuine Tobacco were, / Or Panachæa, or Polygony, / She found, and brought it to her patient deare [...].

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin panacēa, from Ancient Greek πανάκεια (panakeia), from πανακής (panakēs, all-healing), from πᾶν (pan, all) + ἄκος (akos, cure).

NounEdit

panacea f (plural panacee)

  1. panacea, cure-all

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πανάκεια (panakeia), from πανακής (panakēs, all-healing), from πᾶν (pan, all) + ἄκος (akos, cure).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

panacēa f (genitive panacēae); first declension

  1. A particular kind of plant, believed to cure all diseases.
  2. panacea, catholicon.

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative panacēa panacēae
genitive panacēae panacēārum
dative panacēae panacēīs
accusative panacēam panacēās
ablative panacēā panacēīs
vocative panacēa panacēae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin panacēa, Ancient Greek πανάκεια (panakeia), from πανακής (panakēs, all-healing), from πᾶν (pan, all) + ἄκος (akos, cure).

NounEdit

panacea f (plural panaceas)

  1. panacea
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 11:35