See also: pärsōn

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English persoun, from Anglo-Norman, Old French persone (parson, person), from Medieval Latin persona (parson, person), from Latin persona (person). Doublet of person and persona.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

parson (plural parsons)

  1. An Anglican cleric having full legal control of a parish under ecclesiastical law; a rector.
  2. A Protestant minister.
  3. (now chiefly historical) A Roman Catholic priest of an independent parish church.
    • c. 1503–1512, John Skelton, Ware the Hauke; republished in John Scattergood, editor, John Skelton: The Complete English Poems, 1983, OCLC 8728872, lines 35–37, page 62:
      a lewde curate,
      A parson benyfyced
      But nothynge well advysed.

SynonymsEdit


Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

parson m (oblique plural parsons, nominative singular parsons, nominative plural parson)

  1. Alternative form of persone (in the sense "parson")