persona

See also: personá, persóna, and personā

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin persōna (mask; character), of uncertain origin. Possibly from personō (to sound through); or from Ancient Greek πρόσωπον (prósōpon, face; appearance; mask used in ancient theatre to denote a character or, more generally, a social role); or from Etruscan 𐌘𐌄𐌓𐌔𐌖 (φersu). Doublet of person and parson.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

persona (plural personas or personae or personæ)

  1. A social role.
  2. A character played by an actor.
  3. (psychology) The mask or appearance one presents to the world.
  4. (marketing, user experience) An imaginary person representing a particular type of client or customer, considered when designing products and services that will appeal to them.

DescendantsEdit

  • Japanese: ペルソナ (perusona)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

 
Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ast

EtymologyEdit

From Latin persōna (person).

NounEdit

persona f (plural persones)

  1. person

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan persona, from Latin persōna (person).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

persona f (plural persones)

  1. person

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English persona, ultimately from Latin persōna. Doublet with persoon (person).

NounEdit

persona f (plural persona's)

  1. (marketing, user experience) an imaginary person representing a particular type of client or customer, considered when designing products and services that will appeal to them; a persona

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [perˈsona]
  • Hyphenation: per‧so‧na
  • Rhymes: -ona

AdjectiveEdit

persona (accusative singular personan, plural personaj, accusative plural personajn)

  1. personal

FinnishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

persona

  1. Essive singular form of perso.

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin persona.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [pərˈsona]
  • Hyphenation: pêr‧so‧na

NounEdit

pêrsona

  1. person,
    1. an individual; usually a human being.
    2. (grammar) a linguistic category used to distinguish between the speaker of an utterance and those to whom or about whom he is speaking.
  2. persona,
    1. a social role.
    2. the mask or appearance one presents to the world.

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin persōna (person), of Etruscan origin.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /perˈso.na/
  • Hyphenation: per‧so‧na
  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

persona f (plural persone)

  1. person, pl people, persons
  2. someone, somebody, anybody
    Synonyms: qualcuno, nessuno
  3. body, figure
  4. (law) person, body
    Synonyms: corpo, personale, aspetto
  5. (psychology) persona

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin persōna (person).

NounEdit

persona f (plural persones)

  1. person

LatgalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin persona. Cognates include Latvian persona.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

persona f

  1. person

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN, page 27

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown. Links have been suggested

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

persōna f (genitive persōnae); first declension

  1. mask
  2. character
  3. (grammar) person
  4. (Medieval Latin) a person, personality
  5. (Medieval Latin) a lord
  6. (Medieval Latin) dignity
DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative persōna persōnae
Genitive persōnae persōnārum
Dative persōnae persōnīs
Accusative persōnam persōnās
Ablative persōnā persōnīs
Vocative persōna persōnae
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • persona in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • persona in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • persona in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • persona in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • persona in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • persona in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Palmer, L.R. (1906) The Latin Language, London, Faber and Faber

Etymology 2Edit

Inflection of the verb personō.

VerbEdit

personā

  1. second-person singular active imperative of personō

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin persōna (person).

NounEdit

persona f (4th declension)

  1. person
  2. individual
  3. character

DeclensionEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan persona, from Latin persona.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

persona f (plural personas)

  1. person

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin persōna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

persona f

  1. (obsolete) person
  2. (ironically) personage (famous or important person)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • persona in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • persona in Polish dictionaries at PWN

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin persōna (person)[1].

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /peɾˈsona/, [peɾˈso.na]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ona
  • Hyphenation: per‧so‧na

NounEdit

persona f (plural personas)

  1. person (an individual; usually a human being)
    Synonym: individuo

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit