See also: Minister

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ministre, from Old French ministre, from Latin minister(an attendant, servant, assistant, a priest's assistant or other under official), from minor(less) + -ter; see minor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

minister ‎(plural ministers)

 
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  1. A person who is trained to preach, to perform religious ceremonies and to afford pastoral care at a Protestant church.
    The minister said a prayer on behalf of the entire congregation.
  2. A politician who heads a ministry (national or regional government department for public service).
    He was newly appointed to be Minister of the Interior.
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
      Ministers to kings, whose eyes, ears, and hands they are, must be answerable to God and man.
  3. At a diplomacy, the rank of diplomat directly below ambassador.
  4. A servant; a subordinate; an officer or assistant of inferior rank; hence, an agent, an instrument.
    • Bible, Exodus xxiv. 13
      Moses rose up, and his minister Joshua.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      I chose / Camillo for the minister, to poison / My friend Polixenes.

Usage notesEdit

Not to be confused with minster.

HypernymsEdit

  • (Chief minister in areas of Central Europe and Scandinavia): provost

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

minister ‎(third-person singular simple present ministers, present participle ministering, simple past and past participle ministered)

  1. (transitive) To attend to (the needs of); to tend; to take care (of); to give aid; to give service.
    A newspaper headline: Couple leaves business world to minister to inner-city children
  2. to function as a clergyman or as the officiant in church worship
  3. (transitive, archaic) To afford, to give, to supply.
    • Bible, 2 Corinthians ix. 10
      He that ministereth seed to the sower.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      We minister to God reason to suspect us.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 2 scene 1
      I do well believe your highness; and did it to / minister occasion to these gentlemen [...] (to give opportunity to these gentlemen)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

NounEdit

minister c ‎(definite singular ministeren, indefinite plural ministre, definite plural ministrene)

  1. a minister (politician who heads a ministry)

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

minister m ‎(plural ministers, diminutive ministertje n)

  1. A minister, a person who is commissioned by the government for public service.

Inari SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

minister

  1. minister (politician)

InflectionEdit

Odd inflection[1]
singular plural
Nominative minister ministereh
Accusative minister ministerijd
Genitive minister ministerij
Illative ministerân ministeráid
Locative ministerist ministerijn
Comitative ministeráin ministerijguin
Abessive ministerttáá ministerijttáá
Essive ministerin
Partitive ministerid

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ minister in Giellatekno Inari Sami paradigm generator

LadinEdit

NounEdit

minister m ‎(plural ministeres)

  1. minister
  2. ministry

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From minus + comparative suffix *-tero-. Compare magister.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

minister m ‎(genitive ministrī); second declension

  1. attendant, servant, waiter
  2. agent, aide
  3. accomplice

InflectionEdit

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Case Singular Plural
nominative minister ministrī
genitive ministrī ministrōrum
dative ministrō ministrīs
accusative ministrum ministrōs
ablative ministrō ministrīs
vocative minister1 ministrī

1May also be ministre.

Derived termsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

NounEdit

minister m ‎(definite singular ministeren, indefinite plural ministere or ministre or ministrer, definite plural ministerne or ministrene)

  1. a minister (politician who heads a ministry)

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

NounEdit

minister m ‎(definite singular ministeren, indefinite plural ministrar, definite plural ministrane)

  1. a minister (politician who heads a ministry)

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French ministère.

NounEdit

minister n ‎(plural ministere)

  1. ministry

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

minister c

  1. a minister (member of government, cabinet)
  2. a minister (in the foreign affairs administration)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of minister 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative minister ministern ministrar ministrarna
Genitive ministers ministerns ministrars ministrarnas

Related termsEdit