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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

particular +‎ -ly

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

particularly (not comparable)

  1. (focus) Especially, extremely.
    The apéritifs were particularly stimulating.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      We made an odd party before the arrival of the Ten, particularly when the Celebrity dropped in for lunch or dinner.
    • 2013 July 19, Mark Tran, “Denied an education by war”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 1:
      One particularly damaging, but often ignored, effect of conflict on education is the proliferation of attacks on schools [] as children, teachers or school buildings become the targets of attacks. Parents fear sending their children to school. Girls are particularly vulnerable to sexual violence.
  2. (degree) To a great extent.
  3. Specifically, uniquely or individually.
    • 2013, Phil McNulty, "[1]", BBC Sport, 1 September 2013:
      But as the half progressed, Liverpool's pressure and high-tempo passing game increased United's frustration and it threatened to boil over on the stroke of half-time when Van Persie, who had already been booked, was involved in angry verbal exchanges with several Liverpool players, particularly Gerrard.
  4. In detail; with regard to particulars.
  5. (dated) In a particular manner; fussily.
    • 1825, Oxberry's dramatic biography and histrionic anecdotes
      He, rather too particularly perhaps, avoids public company, and is the very reverse of a bon vivant.

TranslationsEdit


ScotsEdit

AdverbEdit

particularly

  1. Particularly.