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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman peiser, peser and Middle French peser, from Latin pēnsāre, present active infinitive of pēnsō (I weigh). Doublet with poise.

VerbEdit

peise (third-person singular simple present peises, present participle peising, simple past and past participle peised)

  1. (obsolete) To weigh or measure the weight of; to poise.
  2. (obsolete, figuratively) To weigh or take the measure of (an immaterial object).

NounEdit

peise (plural peises)

  1. (obsolete) A weight; a poise.
  2. (obsolete) A heavy blow, an impact.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ii:
      Great Ptolomæe it for his lemans sake / Ybuilded all of glasse, by Magicke powre, / And also it impregnable did make; / Yet when his loue was false, he with a peaze it brake.

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

peise

  1. Alternative form of pese