EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French penchant, present participle of pencher (to tilt, to lean), from Middle French, from Old French pengier (to tilt, be out of line), from Vulgar Latin *pendicāre, a derivative of Latin pendere (to hang, to lean).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɑːnʃɑn/, [ˈpɑ̃ʃɑ̃]
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpɛnt͡ʃənt/

NounEdit

penchant (countable and uncountable, plural penchants)

  1. Taste, liking, or inclination (for).
    He has a penchant for fine wine.
  2. (card games, uncountable) A card game resembling bezique.
  3. (card games) In the game of penchant, any queen and jack of different suits held at the same time.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

penchant m (plural penchants)

  1. penchant

VerbEdit

penchant

  1. present participle of pencher

Further readingEdit