peregrine

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English [Term?], borrowed from Old French [Term?], from Latin peregrīnus (foreign). Doublet of pilgrim.

PronunciationEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

peregrine (comparative more peregrine, superlative most peregrine)

  1. Wandering, travelling, migratory.
    The gypsies are perpetually peregrine people.
  2. Not native to a region or country; foreign; alien.
  3. (astrology, of a planet) Lacking essential dignity or debility.
  4. Extrinsic or from without; exotic.
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
      peregrine and preternatural heat
    • 1946, Mervyn Peake, Titus Groan:
      As soon as she had smiled her face altered again, and the petulant expression peregrine to her features took control.

NounEdit

 
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peregrine (plural peregrines)

  1. The peregrine falcon.
  2. (dated) A foreigner; a person resident in a country other than their own.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

peregrīne

  1. vocative singular of peregrīnus

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

peregrine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of peregrinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of peregrinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of peregrinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of peregrinar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

peregrine

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of peregrinar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of peregrinar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of peregrinar.