perfecto

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish perfecto (perfect). Doublet of perfect.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pə(ɹ)ˈfɛktəʊ/
    • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

perfecto (comparative more perfecto, superlative most perfecto)

  1. (informal, humorous) Perfect, excellent, brilliant.

NounEdit

perfecto (plural perfectos)

  1. A large, tapered cigar.
    • 1937, P. G. Wodehouse, 'Lord Emsworth and Others', Overlook, Woodstock: 2002, p 99.
      'Well the only thing I can advise,' I said, 'is that you cultivate him assiduously. Waylay him and give him cigars... Tell him it's a fine day. He has a dog named Edward. Seek Edward out and pat him. Many a young man has won over the father of the girl he loves by such tactics, so why not you?'
      He agreed to do so, and in the days which followed Poskitt could not show his face in the clubhouse without having Wilmot spring out at him with perfectos.
  2. (sports) In baseball or bowling, a perfect game.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally a trade mark (capitalised).

NounEdit

perfecto m (plural perfectos)

  1. bomber jacket

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin perfectus.

AdjectiveEdit

perfecto m (feminine singular perfecta, masculine plural perfectos, feminine plural perfectas)

  1. perfect

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

perfectō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of perfectus

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin perfectus, partially borrowed as a learned term.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /peɾˈfeɡto/, [peɾˈfeɣ̞.t̪o]

AdjectiveEdit

perfecto (feminine perfecta, masculine plural perfectos, feminine plural perfectas)

  1. perfect
    Synonym: impecable

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit