EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin perforō (I bore or pierce through; I perforate), from per- (through, thorough) + forō (I bore, I pierce)

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

perforate (third-person singular simple present perforates, present participle perforating, simple past and past participle perforated)

  1. (transitive) To pierce; to penetrate.
  2. (transitive) To make a line of holes in (a thin material) to allow separation at the line.
    to perforate a sheet of postage stamps

TroponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

perforate (not comparable)

  1. (philately, biology) perforated
    • 1999 Nguyen Van Dzu and Peter C. Boyce. Kew Bulletin 54(2):379-393.
      A species of remarkable appearance with mature leaf laminae often so profoundly perforate as to resemble a fragile net of tissue.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • perforate” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

perforate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of perforare
  2. second-person plural imperative of perforare
  3. feminine plural of perforato

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

perforāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of perforō