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See also: pie-in-the-sky

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
Labor activist and songwriter Joe Hill who composed the song “The Preacher and the Slave” (1911), from which the phrase pie in the sky originates

The phrase is originally from the song “The Preacher and the Slave” (1911) by Swedish-American labor activist and songwriter Joe Hill (1879–1915), which he wrote as a parody of the Salvation Army hymnIn the Sweet By-and-By” (published 1868). The song criticizes the Salvation Army for focusing on people’s salvation rather than on their material needs:[1]

You will eat, bye and bye,
In that glorious land above the sky;
Work and pray, live on hay,
You’ll get pie in the sky when you die.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pie in the sky (uncountable)

  1. (idiomatic) A fanciful notion; an unrealistic or ludicrous concept; the illusory promise of a desired outcome that is unlikely to happen.
    • 1950, Anya Seton [pseudonym; Anya Seton Chase], Foxfire, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin; republished Boston, Mass.: Mariner Books, 2015, ISBN 978-0-544-24215-9, page 124:
      Don't you think I have anything better to do than go scrambling around hundreds of square miles of the toughest wilderness in the state looking for pie in the sky?
    • 1994, Alfred W. Crosby[, Jr.], “Demography, Maize, Land, and the American Character”, in Germs, Seeds & Animals: Studies in Ecological History (Sources and Studies in World History), Armonk, N.Y.; London: M. E. Sharpe, ISBN 978-1-56324-249-6, page 167:
      [M]ost Americans are chronically materialistic and optimistic, more interested in short-range than long-range prospects, and have been for many generations. Pie on the table today or, at the latest, tomorrow—apple pie, mince pie, pecan pie, apricot pie, coconut cream pie, lemon meringue pie, peach cobbler pie, blueberry, blackberry, huckleberry, and pizza pie—that is what they want, not "pie in the sky," whether the source of that promise be Christianity or Marxism.
    • 2015, Sophie Hudson, “The Brat Pack Movies Didn’t Really Cover this Part”, in Home is Where My People Are: The Roads that Lead Us to Where We Belong, Carol Stream, Ill.: Tyndale House Publishers, ISBN 978-1-4143-9173-1, page 117:
      [] I grew in the House Full of Practical People, so any grand, dream-chasing pursuit has always struck me as sort of pie in the sky.

SynonymsEdit

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brendan Koerner (15 January 2003), “Where does the phrase ‘pie in the sky’ come from?”, in Slate[1], archived from the original on 2 December 2016; “pie in the sky” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2017, retrieved 21 July 2017.

Further readingEdit