pilum

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin pilum

NounEdit

pilum (plural pila or pilums)

  1. A Roman military javelin.
    • 1776 Besides a lighter spear, the Roman legionary grasped in his right hand the formidable pilum, a ponderous javelin whose utmost length was about six feet and which was terminated by a massy triangular point of steel of about eighteen inches. This instrument was indeed much inferior to our modern fire-arms; since it was exhausted by a single discharge at the distance of only ten or twelve paces. Yet when it was launched by a skilled and firm hand, there was not any cavalry that durst venture within its reach, or any shield or corslet that could withstand the impetuosity of its weight. : The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire : Edward Gibbon. This edition Penguin 2000. p. 21

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

pīlum (throwing spear)

EtymologyEdit

Unknown etymology.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pīlum n (genitive pīlī); second declension

  1. a javelin, throwing spear

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative pīlum pīla
genitive pīlī pīlōrum
dative pīlō pīlīs
accusative pīlum pīla
ablative pīlō pīlīs
vocative pīlum pīla

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 12:04