pilum

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE root
*peys-

Latin pilum

NounEdit

pilum ‎(plural pila or pilums)

  1. (historical) A Roman military javelin.
    • 1776, Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Penguin 2000, p. 21:
      Besides a lighter spear, the Roman legionary grasped in his right hand the formidable pilum, a ponderous javelin whose utmost length was about six feet and which was terminated by a massy triangular point of steel of about eighteen inches.
    • 2011, Ben Aaronovitch, Rivers of London, Gollancz 2011, p. 371:
      Verica plucked a pilum from the hands of the nearest legionary – the soldier didn't react – and handed it to me.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

pīlum (throwing spear)

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *pistlom, from Proto-Indo-European *pis-tlo-, from *peys- ‎(to crush). See pīla.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pīlum n ‎(genitive pīlī); second declension

  1. a javelin, throwing spear

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative pīlum pīla
genitive pīlī pīlōrum
dative pīlō pīlīs
accusative pīlum pīla
ablative pīlō pīlīs
vocative pīlum pīla

DescendantsEdit

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