See also: Piluś

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin pilus (hair). Doublet of pile.

NounEdit

pilus (plural pili)

  1. A hair.
  2. (microbiology) A hairlike appendage found on the cell surface of many bacteria.
  3. (biochemistry) A bacterial protein that has several biochemical functions

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

NounEdit

pilus m (plural pili)

  1. pilus (bacterial appendage)

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

pilus

  1. inessive singular of pilu

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *pil- (one string of hair).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pilus m (genitive pilī); second declension

  1. (anatomy) A hair.
  2. (figuratively) An insignificant amount; iota; least amount
DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pilus pilī
Genitive pilī pilōrum
Dative pilō pilīs
Accusative pilum pilōs
Ablative pilō pilīs
Vocative pile pilī
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Aromanian: per
  • Asturian: pelu, pelo
  • Catalan: pèl
  • Dalmatian: pail
  • English: pile (fine underfur of certain animals), pelage
  • French: poil
  • Friulian: pêl
  • Galician: pelo
  • Ido: pilo
  • Istro-Romanian: per
  • Italian: pelo

Etymology 2Edit

From pīlum (javelin).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pīlus m (genitive pīlī); second declension

  1. A maniple of the triāriī; a reserve company of veteran soldiers.
DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pīlus pīlī
Genitive pīlī pīlōrum
Dative pīlō pīlīs
Accusative pīlum pīlōs
Ablative pīlō pīlīs
Vocative pīle pīlī
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • pilus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pilus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pilus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pilus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  1. ^ Nostratic Etymology 867.