spear

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English spear, spere, from Old English spere, from Proto-Germanic *speri (compare West Frisian spear, Dutch speer, German Speer, Old Norse spjör), from *sparron (compare Middle Dutch sparre (rafter), Old Norse sparri (spar, rafter), sperra (rafter, beam)), from Proto-Indo-European *spar- (compare Latin sparus (short spear), Albanian ferrë (thorn, thornbush)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spear (plural spears)

  1. A long stick with a sharp tip used as a weapon for throwing or thrusting, or anything used to make a thrusting motion.
  2. (now chiefly historical) A soldier armed with such a weapon; a spearman.
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 187:
      Two of the four spears came directly from Lady Margaret's staff. One was her great-nephew Maurice St John […].
  3. A sharp tool used by fishermen to retrieve fish.
  4. (ice hockey) an illegal maneuver using the end of a hockey stick to strike into another hockey player.
  5. (wrestling) a running tackle on an opponent performed in professional wrestling.
  6. A spearman.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  7. A shoot, as of grass; a spire.
  8. The feather of a horse.
  9. The rod to which the bucket, or plunger, of a pump is attached; a pump rod.
  10. A long, thin strip from a vegetable.
    asparagus and broccoli spears

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

spear (third-person singular simple present spears, present participle spearing, simple past and past participle speared)

  1. To penetrate or strike with, or as if with, any long narrow object. To make a thrusting motion that catches an object on the tip of a long device.
  2. (intransitive) To shoot into a long stem, as some plants do.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *speri. Compare English spear, Dutch speer, German Speer.

NounEdit

spear c (plural spearen, diminutive spearke)

  1. spear
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 23:42