See also: PLoP and plöp

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Imitative of the sound, or perhaps a variant of plap.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plop (plural plops)

  1. A sound or action like liquid hitting a hard surface, or an object falling into a body of water.
    He heard the plops of rain on the roof.
  2. (Britain, slang) excrement; derived from the "plop" sound made when it hits water in a toilet.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

plop (third-person singular simple present plops, present participle plopping, simple past and past participle plopped)

  1. To make the sound of an object dropping into a body of liquid.
    • 2012, Augusta Trobaugh, Music From Beyond The Moon (page 43)
      Stooping, she picked up another pebble, sounded out the word again, and tossed it into the shallow water near the path, where it plopped into the water, sending out circles from where it fell.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To land heavily or loosely.
    He plopped down on the sofa to watch TV.
    2009, Reif Larson, The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet, Pinguin Books, p. 37:
    There was a world inside that tall grass. You could plop yourself down in the middle of it with the scraggly stems against the back of your neck and the endless grasses rising up and jackknifing against the bigbluesky, and the ranch and all of its players would fade into a distant dream.
  3. (Britain) To defecate; derived from the "plop" sound made when excrement hits water in a toilet.

TranslationsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *ploppus from classical Latin pōpulus. Compare Romanian plop.

NounEdit

plop m (plural plochi)

  1. poplar

RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *ploppus, from classical Latin pōpulus. Compare Italian pioppo.

NounEdit

plop m (plural plopi)

  1. poplar
    Pe lângă plopii fără soț, adesea am trecut.
    By the pairless poplars, often have I passed.

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit