Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Semitic *pay- (mouth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pe

  1. The seventeenth letter of many Semitic alphabets/abjads (Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew פ, Syriac ܦ, and others; Arabic has the analog faa).

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *petja, from Proto-Indo-European *petino, from *pet 'to spread out, to extend' (compare English fathom). Alternatively from Latin pannus 'cloth, rag, garment'; cf. Greek πανί (paní).[1]

NounEdit

pe m (indefinite plural penjë, definite singular peri, definite plural penjtë)

  1. thread
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (2000) A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, Leiden: Brill, page 313

AnnoboneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sãotomense pe (father), from Portuguese pai (father), from Old Portuguese pay, padre (father), from Latin patrem (father), from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

NounEdit

pe

  1. father

ReferencesEdit

  • 2005, John H. McWhorter, Defining Creole

BretonEdit

ConjunctionEdit

pe

  1. or

AdjectiveEdit

pe (interrogative adjective)

  1. which, what

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

pe f (plural pes)

  1. The Hebrew letter פ (final form ף).
  2. The name of the Latin-script letter P/p.

DorigEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pe

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


FaroeseEdit

NounEdit

pe n (genitive singular pes, plural pe)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P/p.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of pe
n4 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative pe peið pe peini
accusative pe peið pe peini
dative pe, pei penum peum peunum
genitive pes pesins pea peanna

See alsoEdit


FinnishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Abbreviation of perjantai.

AbbreviationEdit

pe

  1. perjantai (Friday)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pe

  1. pe (seventeenth letter of the Hebrew and Phoenician scripts and the Northwest Semitic abjad)
DeclensionEdit
Inflection of pe (Kotus type 21/rosé, no gradation)
nominative pe pet
genitive pen peiden
peitten
partitive petä peitä
illative pehen peihin
singular plural
nominative pe pet
accusative nom. pe pet
gen. pen
genitive pen peiden
peitten
partitive petä peitä
inessive pessä peissä
elative pestä peistä
illative pehen peihin
adessive pellä peillä
ablative peltä peiltä
allative pelle peille
essive penä peinä
translative peksi peiksi
instructive pein
abessive pettä peittä
comitative peineen

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pe (plural pe-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter P/p.

See alsoEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

pe

  1. Rōmaji transcription of (hiragana)
  2. Rōmaji transcription of (katakana)

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(indeclinable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P/p.

Coordinate termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • pe in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pe in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

LigurianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin per, from Proto-Indo-European *peri, derived from the root *per- (to go over).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

pe

  1. for
  2. to
  3. through
  4. in or on
  5. by
  6. with
  7. as
pe + article Combined form
pe + o pe-o
pe + a pe-a
pe + i pe-i
pe + e pe-e

LoteEdit

ConjunctionEdit

pe

  1. and

ReferencesEdit


Mezquital OtomiEdit

NeapolitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin per.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

pe

  1. for

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pedem, accusative of pes. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French pié.

NounEdit

pe m (oblique plural pes, nominative singular pes, nominative plural pe)

  1. foot (anatomy)

DescendantsEdit


PaliEdit

ParticleEdit

pe

  1. Abbreviation of peyyāla.

RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Muntenia, informal), pi (Moldova), pre (archaic)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin per, with meaning influenced by super.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

pe (+accusative)

  1. on
    cartea este pe masă - The book is on the table.
  2. (no lexical meaning) used to indicate direct object in some cases
    o aștept pe mama - I'm waiting on/for mom.

Usage notesEdit

Pe takes the accusative case of nouns and is used as the marker for the direct object when said object is:

  • a proper noun; the name of a person or animal
  • a common noun referring to a specific person, generally known to both the speaker and listener
  • a common noun acting as a metaphor for a person
  • a common noun in a construction in which the subject and the direct object are the same noun and they precede the predicate

Pe is not used when the direct object is:

  • a common noun designating inanimate objects or animals
  • a common noun referring to an unspecified person

Related termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sursilvan) pei
  • (Puter, Vallader)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pēs, pedem (foot), from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

NounEdit

pe m (plural pes or peis)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, anatomy) foot

Usage notesEdit

In Rumantsch Grischun and Sutsilvan, the plural is pes. In Surmiran, however, it is peis.


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pe/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -e

NounEdit

pe f (plural pes)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P/p.

Further readingEdit


Tocharian AEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds. Compare the nominative/accusative dual form, peṃ, presumably from a Proto-Tocharian dual *peine (whence also Tocharian B nominative/accusative dual form paine), from an earlier *pei, from the Proto-Indo-European dual *póde, from *pṓds. It is from this dual form in Proto-Tocharian that the singular forms have probably been analogically built. Compare Tocharian B paiyye. [1]

NounEdit

pe m

  1. foot

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


TurkishEdit

NounEdit

pe (definite accusative peyi, plural peler)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P/p.

See alsoEdit


TurkmenEdit

NounEdit

pe (definite accusative ?, plural ?)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter P/p.

WelshEdit

ConjunctionEdit

pe

  1. if
    Pe bawn i'n gyfoethog, teithiwn i o gwmpas y byd — If I were rich, I would travel around the world.