See also: Bok, bök, bók, and bøk

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Afrikaans bok. Doublet of buck.

AdjectiveEdit

bok

  1. (South Africa, slang) keen or willing.
    "Do you want to go to the movies?" "Ja, I'm bok."

Etymology 2Edit

Imitative

InterjectionEdit

bok

  1. The clucking sound of a chicken.
    • 2000, William S Pollack, Todd Shuster, Real boys' voices
      And he says, "Chicken! Bok bok bok bok!" One time I got up and put the controller down and we started fighting.
    • 2004, Andrew Bennett, Nicholas Royle, An introduction to literature, criticism and theory
      So the librarian gives the chicken a book. The chicken goes away, but comes back the next day, goes up to the librarian's desk and says: 'Bok, bok!'

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch bok (buck, male goat), from Middle Dutch boc, from Old Dutch buc, from Proto-Germanic *bukkaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok (plural bokke, diminutive bokkie)

  1. goat
  2. antelope, buck
    Synonym: wildsbok
  3. (slang) lover (term of affection)
    Synonym: bokkie
  4. vaulting horse
  5. blunder

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Xhosa: ibhokhwe

AdjectiveEdit

bok (attributive bokke, comparative bokker, superlative bokste)

  1. keen, willing

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Philippine English bok, from bunk, shortened from bunkmate.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: bok

NounEdit

bok

  1. one's batchmate or classmate in the Philippine Military Academy

ChoctawEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested as bayuk in the 17th century.

NounEdit

bōk (alienable)

  1. creek, stream
  2. river

DeclensionEdit

possessive (alienable) singular paucal plural
first-person ("my, our") abōk pibōk hapibōk
second-person ("thy, your") chibōk hachibōk
third-person ("his, her,
its, their")
ibōk
absolute nominative accusative oblique
neutral bōk bōkat bōka bōkak
contrastive bōkakō bōkakōsh bōkako bōkakakō
bōkato bōkano
focus bōkō bōkakō
bōkōsh bōko
-ma
"that, there"
-pa
"this, here"
-kia
"also, too"
-ba
"only"
-ōk
"but"
-akhī
pejorative
bōkma bōkpa bōk(ak)kia bōkba bōkōk bōkakhī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bokъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok m

  1. side
  2. flank
  3. (anatomy) hip

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bok in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bok in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch boc, from Old Dutch buc, from Proto-West Germanic *bukk, from Proto-Germanic *bukkaz.

NounEdit

bok m (plural bokken, diminutive bokje n)

  1. male goat, billy
    Synonym: geitenbok
  2. buck, horse or pony; strong contraption on legs, resembling a mount
    1. (gymnastics) vaulting horse
    2. sawbuck
      Synonym: zaagbok
    3. a crane on legs
  3. box, perch (driver's seat on a carriage)
  4. (printing) job case, type case
  5. (derogatory) churl, grouch
  6. (derogatory) oaf, bumpkin
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

bok

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bokken
  2. imperative of bokken

Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bokъ. Cognate with Upper Sorbian bok, Polish bok, Czech bok, Russian бок (bok), and Serbo-Croatian bȍk.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok m

  1. side (bounding straight edge of an object; flat surface of an object; left or right half; surface of a sheet of paper)
  2. page (one side of a leaf of a book)
  3. (chiefly in the dual) breast (organs on the front of a woman’s chest, which contain the mammary glands)
    Synonym: prědk

DeclensionEdit

  • Alternative locative singular: boce

Further readingEdit

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “bok”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • bok in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

MaranaoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From buhok, compare Tagalog buhok.

NounEdit

bok

  1. head hair

MarshalleseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok

  1. blister
  2. chicken pox

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok

  1. bladder

Etymology 3Edit

From English book.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok (construct form bokin)

  1. book

Etymology 4Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok

  1. sand
  2. sandspit
  3. sandbar

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

bok

  1. Alternative form of booke

Middle Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon bōk, from Proto-West Germanic *bōk, from Proto-Germanic *bōks.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bôk n

  1. book
  2. beechnut

DescendantsEdit

  • Low German:
    Dutch Low Saxon: book
    German Low German: Book
  • Plautdietsch: Buak

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bók (beech, book), from Proto-Germanic *bōks (letter), either from *bōkō (beech), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵos (beech), or from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂g- (to divide, distribute, allot).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok f or m (definite singular boka or boken, indefinite plural bøker, definite plural bøkene)

  1. a book

Derived termsEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

NounEdit

bok f or m (definite singular boka or boken, indefinite plural boker, definite plural bokene)

  1. a beech (tree).

Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bók, from Proto-Germanic *bōks. Akin to English book.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok f (definite singular boka, indefinite plural bøker, definite plural bøkene)

  1. a book

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *bōk, from Proto-Germanic *bōks, whence also Old English bōc, Old Frisian bōk, Old High German buoh, Old Norse bók.

NounEdit

bōk f or n

  1. book

DeclensionEdit


Declension 2Edit


DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: bôk, buk
    • Low German:
      Dutch Low Saxon: book
      German Low German: Book
    • Plautdietsch: Buak

Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bók, from Proto-Germanic *bōks.

NounEdit

bōk f

  1. book

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bokъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok m inan

  1. side, flank (neither the front nor the back)
    Synonym: strona

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bok in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bok in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *bokъ.

NounEdit

bȍk m (Cyrillic spelling бо̏к)

  1. side
    bok uz bokside by side
  2. flank
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Slavic *bogъ. Other fringe theories exist but are largely unsupported.

Alternative formsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bok (Cyrillic spelling бок)

  1. (Croatia) hi
    Synonyms: zdravo, pozdrav, ćao
  2. (Croatia) bye
    Synonyms: zbogom, zdravo, pozdrav, ćao



SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish bōk, from Old Norse bók, from Proto-Germanic *bōks, of uncertain origin but usually connected to Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵ- (beech) or Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂g- (to allot)

NounEdit

bok c

  1. book:
    1. collection of sheets of paper
    2. a work of literature
    3. a major division of a published work
DeclensionEdit
Declension of bok 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bok boken böcker böckerna
Genitive boks bokens böckers böckernas
Derived termsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish bōk, from Old Norse bók, from Proto-Germanic *bōkō, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵos.

NounEdit

bok c

  1. beech
DeclensionEdit
Declension of bok 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bok boken bokar bokarna
Genitive boks bokens bokars bokarnas
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *bok (dirt, dung). Cognate with Old Turkic [script needed] (bok), Kazakh боқ (boq), Azerbaijani pox, Kyrgyz бок (boq), etc.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok (definite accusative boku, plural boklar)

  1. shit (solid excretory product evacuated from the bowel)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative bok
Definite accusative boku
Singular Plural
Nominative bok boklar
Definite accusative boku bokları
Dative boka boklara
Locative bokta boklarda
Ablative boktan boklardan
Genitive bokun bokların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular bokum boklarım
2nd singular bokun bokların
3rd singular boku bokları
1st plural bokumuz boklarımız
2nd plural bokunuz boklarınız
3rd plural bokları bokları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular bokumu boklarımı
2nd singular bokunu boklarını
3rd singular bokunu boklarını
1st plural bokumuzu boklarımızı
2nd plural bokunuzu boklarınızı
3rd plural boklarını boklarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular bokuma boklarıma
2nd singular bokuna boklarına
3rd singular bokuna boklarına
1st plural bokumuza boklarımıza
2nd plural bokunuza boklarınıza
3rd plural boklarına boklarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular bokumda boklarımda
2nd singular bokunda boklarında
3rd singular bokunda boklarında
1st plural bokumuzda boklarımızda
2nd plural bokunuzda boklarınızda
3rd plural boklarında boklarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular bokumdan boklarımdan
2nd singular bokundan boklarından
3rd singular bokundan boklarından
1st plural bokumuzdan boklarımızdan
2nd plural bokunuzdan boklarınızdan
3rd plural boklarından boklarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular bokumun boklarımın
2nd singular bokunun boklarının
3rd singular bokunun boklarının
1st plural bokumuzun boklarımızın
2nd plural bokunuzun boklarınızın
3rd plural boklarının boklarının

Derived termsEdit


VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bok (nominative plural boks)

  1. box

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit