prelude

See also: prélude and préludé

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French prélude (singing to test a musical instrument), from Medieval Latin preludium, from Latin praelūdere.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɹɛl(j)uːd/, /ˈpɹeɪl(j)uːd/, /ˈpɹiːluːd/
  • (file)

NounEdit

prelude (plural preludes)

  1. An introductory or preliminary performance or event.
    Synonym: preface
  2. (music) A short, free-form piece of music, originally one serving as an introduction to a longer and more complex piece; later, starting with the Romantic period, generally a stand-alone piece. [from 1650s]
    Synonyms: intrada, overture
  3. (computing) A standard module or library of subroutines and functions to be imported, generally by default, into a program.
  4. (figuratively) A forerunner to anything.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

prelude (third-person singular simple present preludes, present participle preluding, simple past and past participle preluded)

  1. To introduce something, as a prelude.
  2. To play an introduction or prelude; to give a prefatory performance.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ prelude” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

prelude

  1. third-person singular present indicative of preludere

AnagramsEdit