Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From prōficiō(advance, make headway).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

proficīscor ‎(present infinitive proficīscī, perfect active profectus sum); third conjugation, deponent

  1. I set out, depart, leave.

InflectionEdit

   Conjugation of proficiscor (third conjugation, deponent)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present proficīscor proficīsceris, proficīscere proficīscitur proficīscimur proficīsciminī proficīscuntur
imperfect proficīscēbar proficīscēbāris, proficīscēbāre proficīscēbātur proficīscēbāmur proficīscēbāminī proficīscēbantur
future proficīscar proficīscēris, proficīscēre proficīscētur proficīscēmur proficīscēminī proficīscentur
perfect profectus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect profectus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect profectus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present proficīscar proficīscāris, proficīscāre proficīscātur proficīscāmur proficīscāminī proficīscantur
imperfect proficīscerer proficīscerēris, proficīscerēre proficīscerētur proficīscerēmur proficīscerēminī proficīscerentur
perfect profectus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect profectus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present proficīscere proficīsciminī
future proficīscitor proficīscitor proficīscuntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives proficīscī profectus esse profectūrus esse
participles proficīscēns profectus profectūrus proficīscendus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
proficīscī proficīscendī proficīscendō proficīscendum profectum profectū

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • proficiscor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • proficiscor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.proficiscor”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to invade the territory of the Sequani: in Sequanos proficisci
    • to set out by the Appian road: Appia via proficisci
    • to go abroad: peregre proficisci
    • to advance in the direction of Rome: Romam versus proficisci
    • to set out for Rome: ad Romam proficisci
    • he starts in all haste, precipitately: properat, maturat proficisci
    • to start from small beginnings: ab exiguis initiis proficisci
    • to originate in, arise from: ab aliqua re proficisci
    • to be based on a sound principle: a certa ratione proficisci
    • to start from false premises: a falsis principiis proficisci
    • to start from a definition: a definitione proficisci
    • to go into exile: in exsilium ire, pergere, proficisci
    • to set out for one's province: in provinciam proficisci (Liv. 38. 35)
    • to go to Cilicia as pro-consul: pro consule in Ciliciam proficisci
    • to go to war, commence a campaign: proficisci ad bellum, in expeditionem (Sall. Iug. 103)