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BretonEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

eo

  1. third-person singular present indicative of bezañ

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *esoxs (cognate to Middle Welsh ehawc, modern Welsh eog).

NounEdit

eo m (genitive singular iach, nominative plural iaich)

  1. (literary) salmon
    Synonym: bradán
  2. (figuratively) noble being, prince
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *iwos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eyHweh₂ (yew); cognate with Welsh yw and English yew.

NounEdit

eo f (genitive singular eo)

  1. (literary) yew tree
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

eo m (genitive singular eo)

  1. (literary) point (of blade); pin, brooch
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
eo n-eo heo t-eo
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈe.o/, [ˈeːo]
  • Hyphenation: é‧o

PronounEdit

eo (personal, first person, possessive meo)

  1. Obsolete form of io.

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.oː/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *eō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁éyti.

VerbEdit

(present infinitive īre, perfect active or īvī, supine itum); irregular conjugation, irregular

  1. (intransitive) to go (any kind of animate or inanimate motion: walk, ride, sail, fly, etc.)
    Romani ite domum!
    Romans, go home!
    Romani ierunt domum.
    The Romans have gone home.
    • 63 BCE, Cicero, Catiline Orations Oratio in Catilinam altera ad populum.15:
      Est mihi tanti, Quirites, huius invidiae falsae atque iniquae tempestatem subire, dum modo a vobis huius horribilis belli ac nefarii periculum depellatur. Dicatur sane eiectus esse a me, dum modo eat in exsilium. Sed, mihi credite, non est iturus.
      • Translation by Albert Clark
        I am not unwilling, O Romans, to endure this storm of false and unjust unpopularity as long as the danger of this horrible and nefarious war is warded off from you. Let him be said to be banished by me as long as he goes into banishment; but, believe me, he will not go.
  2. to proceed, advance
  3. to result, happen as a consequence
  4. to prepare (for some action); to set about
  5. (law) to accede, go over to the opposing opinion or other side in voting
  6. (business) to go for; to be sold at (a certain price)
ConjugationEdit

Irregular, but similar to fourth conjugation. The third principal part occasionally appears as īvī in Plautus, but never in Cicero, Caesar, Sallust, or Livy. The perfect active infinitive and pluperfect subjunctive stem īsse occurs twice as iisse in the PHI corpus.[1]

   Conjugation of (irregular)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present īs it īmus ītis eunt
imperfect ībam ībās ībat ībāmus ībātis ībant
future ībō ībis ībit ībimus ībitis ībunt
perfect , īvī īstī, īvistī iit, īvit iimus īstis iērunt, iēre
pluperfect ieram ierās ierat ierāmus ierātis ierant
future perfect ierō ieris ierit ierimus ieritis ierint
passive present eor īris, īre ītur īmur īminī euntur
imperfect ībar ībāris, ībāre ībātur ībāmur ībāminī ībantur
future ībor īberis, ībere ībitur ībimur ībiminī ībuntur
perfect itus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect itus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect itus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present eam eās eat eāmus eātis eant
imperfect īrem īrēs īret īrēmus īrētis īrent
perfect ierim ierīs ierit ierīmus ierītis ierint
pluperfect īssem īssēs īsset īssēmus īssētis īssent
passive present ear eāris, eāre eātur eāmur eāminī eantur
imperfect īrer īrēris, īrēre īrētur īrēmur īrēminī īrentur
perfect itus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect itus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present ī īte
future ītō ītō ītōte euntō
passive present īre īminī
future ītor ītor euntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives īre īsse itūrum esse īrī, īrier1 itum esse itum īrī
participles iēns itūrus itus eundus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
eundī eundō eundum eundō itum itū

1The present passive infinitive in -ier is a rare poetic form which is attested for this verb.

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
See alsoEdit
Further readingEdit
  • eo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • eo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • eo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to go on foot: pedibus ire
    • to meet any one: obviam ire alicui
    • to fall down headlong: praecipitem ire; in praeceps deferri
    • at the same moment that, precisely when: eo ipso tempore, cum; tum ipsum, cum
    • to go to bed: cubitum ire
    • the matter has gone so far that...; the state of affairs is such that..: res eo or in eum locum deducta est, ut...
    • to be ruined, undone: praecipitem agi, ire
    • I heard him say..: ex eo audivi, cum diceret
    • the matter tends towards..., has this object.[1: res eo spectat, ut
    • with the intention of..: eo consilio, ea mente, ut
    • no sound passed his lips: nulla vox est ab eo audita
    • Cicero says in his 'Laelius.: Cicero dicit in Laelio (suo) or in eo (not suo) libro, qui inscribitur Laelius
    • to go to pasture: pastum ire
    • a man's policy is aiming at, directed towards..: alicuius in re publica or capessendae rei publicae consilia eo spectant, ut...
    • to go into exile: in exsilium ire, pergere, proficisci
    • to go into exile: exsulatum ire or abire
    • to vote for some one's motion: discedere (pedibus), ire in alicuius sententiam (Liv. 23. 10)
    • to isolate a witness: aliquem a ceteris separare et in arcam conicere ne quis cum eo colloqui possit (Mil. 22. 60)
    • to march with closed ranks, in order of battle: agmine quadrato incedere, ire
    • to go in search of plunder, booty: praedatum ire
    • to go to fetch wood, water: lignatum, aquatum ire
    • to forage: pabulatum, frumentatum ire
    • much damage was done by this collision: ex eo navium concursu magnum incommodum est acceptum
    • (ambiguous) from youth up: a puero (is), a parvo (is), a parvulo (is)
    • (ambiguous) Fortune's favourite: is, quem fortuna complexa est
    • (ambiguous) I blame this in you; I censure you for this: hoc in te reprehendo (not ob eam rem)
    • (ambiguous) to sully one's fair fame: vitae splendori(em) maculas(is) aspergere
    • (ambiguous) to happen to think of..: in eam cogitationem incidere
    • (ambiguous) to induce a person to think that..: aliquem ad eam cogitationem adducere ut
    • (ambiguous) to discuss a subject more fully on the same lines: plura in eam sententiam disputare
    • (ambiguous) many learned men; many scholars: multi viri docti, or multi et ii docti (not multi docti)
    • (ambiguous) an old proverb which every one knows: proverbium vetustate or sermone tritum (vid. sect. II. 3, note tritus...)
    • (ambiguous) the reader: legentes, ii qui legunt
    • (ambiguous) the debtor: debitor, or is qui debet
    • (ambiguous) the creditor: creditor, or is cui debeo
    • (ambiguous) to advance rapidly: citato gradu incedere (cf. sect. II. 5)
    • (ambiguous) to force a way, a passage: iter tentare per vim (cf. sect. II. 3)
    • (ambiguous) peace is concluded on condition that..: pax convenit in eam condicionem, ut...

Etymology 2Edit

Declined from is. Somewhere it stands as if for eō locō/tempore ("this/that place/time, there, till"), somewhere it stand as if for eō modō ("this/that mode/way, thus"). Compare .

AdverbEdit

(not comparable)

  1. (with abl. or loc.) there, in that place.
  2. (with ablative) therefore, because, for that reason.
  3. (with quo, of quantity) so much, by so much. (= tantō...quantō)
  4. (with dative, of motion) to that place, thither.
  5. (with dative, of tendency) to that end, with that purpose.
  6. (with dative, of time) until, so long, up to that time.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit
  • eo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • eo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • eo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to go on foot: pedibus ire
    • to meet any one: obviam ire alicui
    • to fall down headlong: praecipitem ire; in praeceps deferri
    • at the same moment that, precisely when: eo ipso tempore, cum; tum ipsum, cum
    • to go to bed: cubitum ire
    • the matter has gone so far that...; the state of affairs is such that..: res eo or in eum locum deducta est, ut...
    • to be ruined, undone: praecipitem agi, ire
    • I heard him say..: ex eo audivi, cum diceret
    • the matter tends towards..., has this object.[1: res eo spectat, ut
    • with the intention of..: eo consilio, ea mente, ut
    • no sound passed his lips: nulla vox est ab eo audita
    • Cicero says in his 'Laelius.: Cicero dicit in Laelio (suo) or in eo (not suo) libro, qui inscribitur Laelius
    • to go to pasture: pastum ire
    • a man's policy is aiming at, directed towards..: alicuius in re publica or capessendae rei publicae consilia eo spectant, ut...
    • to go into exile: in exsilium ire, pergere, proficisci
    • to go into exile: exsulatum ire or abire
    • to vote for some one's motion: discedere (pedibus), ire in alicuius sententiam (Liv. 23. 10)
    • to isolate a witness: aliquem a ceteris separare et in arcam conicere ne quis cum eo colloqui possit (Mil. 22. 60)
    • to march with closed ranks, in order of battle: agmine quadrato incedere, ire
    • to go in search of plunder, booty: praedatum ire
    • to go to fetch wood, water: lignatum, aquatum ire
    • to forage: pabulatum, frumentatum ire
    • much damage was done by this collision: ex eo navium concursu magnum incommodum est acceptum
    • (ambiguous) from youth up: a puero (is), a parvo (is), a parvulo (is)
    • (ambiguous) Fortune's favourite: is, quem fortuna complexa est
    • (ambiguous) I blame this in you; I censure you for this: hoc in te reprehendo (not ob eam rem)
    • (ambiguous) to sully one's fair fame: vitae splendori(em) maculas(is) aspergere
    • (ambiguous) to happen to think of..: in eam cogitationem incidere
    • (ambiguous) to induce a person to think that..: aliquem ad eam cogitationem adducere ut
    • (ambiguous) to discuss a subject more fully on the same lines: plura in eam sententiam disputare
    • (ambiguous) many learned men; many scholars: multi viri docti, or multi et ii docti (not multi docti)
    • (ambiguous) an old proverb which every one knows: proverbium vetustate or sermone tritum (vid. sect. II. 3, note tritus...)
    • (ambiguous) the reader: legentes, ii qui legunt
    • (ambiguous) the debtor: debitor, or is qui debet
    • (ambiguous) the creditor: creditor, or is cui debeo
    • (ambiguous) to advance rapidly: citato gradu incedere (cf. sect. II. 5)
    • (ambiguous) to force a way, a passage: iter tentare per vim (cf. sect. II. 3)
    • (ambiguous) peace is concluded on condition that..: pax convenit in eam condicionem, ut...

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronounEdit

  1. ablative masculine/neuter singular of is

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Weiss, Michael. (2009) Outline of the Historical and Comparative Grammar of Latin, p. 429

LinduEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

eo

  1. (chiefly early) Alternative form of yow

ReferencesEdit


NauruanEdit

NounEdit

eo

  1. tongue

ParticleEdit

eo

  1. no

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *aiwaz, whence also Old Norse ei

AdverbEdit

eo

  1. always

DescendantsEdit


SardinianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, from Latin egō, from Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

eo (personal, first person, possessive meu)

  1. I (first-person pronoun)

Scottish GaelicEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish (cognate to Middle Welsh ehawc, modern Welsh eog).

NounEdit

eo m

  1. (obsolete) salmon

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

eo m

  1. (obsolete, dialectal) peg
  2. (obsolete, dialectal) thorn
  3. (obsolete, dialectal) pin

Etymology 3Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

eo m

  1. (obsolete, dialectal) grave

VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Compare Proto-Tai *ˀjeːwᴬ (waist) (whence Thai เอว (eeo)), Chinese (yêu).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(classifier cái) eo

  1. waist

Derived termsEdit