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See also: pulë

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French piauler, a variant of French piailler (to chirp, cheep). Compare Italian pigolare (to cheep as a chicken).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pule (plural pules)

  1. A plaintive melancholy whine

VerbEdit

pule (third-person singular simple present pules, present participle puling, simple past and past participle puled)

  1. (intransitive) To whimper or whine.
    Although the elderly man felt mounting pain from his illness, he never complained or puled.
  2. (intransitive) To pipe or chirp.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • OED 2nd edition 1989

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pule (uncountable)

  1. A Serbian cheese made from donkey milk.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From dialectal Swedish pula (have sex with).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /puːlə/, [ˈpʰuːlə]

VerbEdit

pule (imperative pul, infinitive at pule, present tense puler, past tense pulede, perfect tense har pulet)

  1. (informal, transitive) to fuck roughly

GalicianEdit

GermanEdit

VerbEdit

pule

  1. First-person singular present of pulen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of pulen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of pulen.
  4. Imperative singular of pulen.

HawaiianEdit

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

pule m

  1. plural of pula

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

pule (present tense puler, past tense pulte, past participle pult)

  1. (slang, vulgar) have sex; fuck

PortugueseEdit

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pule

  1. plural of pulă

Usage notesEdit

Although the plural form pule is that which would be found in a dictionary, puli and the other forms based on this plural form are more common.

SynonymsEdit


SamoanEdit

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

pule

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of pulir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of pulir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of pulir.

TonganEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Polynesian *pule, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *buliq.

NounEdit

pule

  1. cowrie shell

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pule

  1. authority
  2. leader; boss

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

pule

  1. dative singular of pul