radicate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin radicatus, past participle of radicari (to take root), from radix (root).

VerbEdit

radicate (third-person singular simple present radicates, present participle radicating, simple past and past participle radicated)

  1. (transitive, rare) To cause to take root; to plant or establish firmly.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To take root; to become established.
  3. (transitive, arithmetic, rare) To extract the root of a number.
    • 1972, Patrick Meredith, Dyslexia and the individual, page 36
      Numbers, arithmetically, can be added, subtracted, multiplied and divided, exponentiated and radicated, []

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AdjectiveEdit

radicate

  1. Rooted; deep-seated; firmly established.
  2. (botany) Having a root; growing from a root; (of a fungus) having rootlike outgrowths at the base of the stipe.
  3. (zoology) Fixed at the bottom as if rooted.

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ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

radicate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of radicare
  2. second-person plural imperative of radicare
  3. feminine plural of radicato

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LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rādīcāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of rādīcātus