EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin fungus (mushroom).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈfʌŋ.ɡəs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋɡəs

NounEdit

fungus (countable and uncountable, plural fungi or funguses)

  1. (mycology) Any member of the kingdom Fungi; a eukaryotic organism typically having chitin cell walls but no chlorophyll or plastids. Fungi may be unicellular or multicellular.
    • 2013 July 20, “Welcome to the plastisphere”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      Plastics are energy-rich substances, which is why many of them burn so readily. Any organism that could unlock and use that energy would do well in the Anthropocene. Terrestrial bacteria and fungi which can manage this trick are already familiar to experts in the field.
  2. (now rare, pathology) A spongy, abnormal excrescence, such as excessive granulation tissue formed in a wound.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: fungas

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin fungus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʏŋ.ɡʏs/, /ˈfʏŋ.ɣʏs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fun‧gus

NounEdit

fungus m (plural fungi)

  1. (mycology) fungus, member of the kingdom Fungi

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fungus m (plural fungus)

  1. Alternative spelling of fongus

LatinEdit

 
fungus (a mushroom)

EtymologyEdit

Originally sfungus. Along with Ancient Greek σπόγγος (spóngos), "sponge" (whence Latin spongia), σφόγγος (sphóngos), and Old Armenian սունկն (sunkn), likely a loanword from a non-Indo-European substrate language. Possibly also related to Georgian სოკო (soḳo), Tsez зикӏу (zik’u), Bezhta сакӏо (sakʼo), Moksha панга (panga) and Erzya панго (pango, mushroom). Linguists such as Kluge and Kroonen have suggested a connection to English swamp and its Germanic cognates.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fungus m (genitive fungī); second declension

  1. a mushroom; a fungus
  2. a fungal growth or infection
  3. a candle-snuff
  4. (figuratively) dolt, idiot

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative fungus fungī
Genitive fungī fungōrum
Dative fungō fungīs
Accusative fungum fungōs
Ablative fungō fungīs
Vocative funge fungī

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7)‎[1], Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN
  • Martirosyan, Hrach (2010) Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 8), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 586–587
  • fungus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fungus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fungus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fungus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to perform the last rites for a person: supremo officio in aliquem fungi
    • (ambiguous) to live a perfect life: virtutis perfectae perfecto munere fungi (Tusc. 1. 45. 109)
    • (ambiguous) to do one's duty: officio suo fungi
    • (ambiguous) to perform official duties: munere fungi, muneri praeesse