EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Related to roke (mist; smoke), Swedish rök (smoke). Compare raggy (foggy).

NounEdit

rawk (plural rawks)

  1. (Yorkshire) A thick fog.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Clare, manuscript poems, quoted in 1854, Anne Elizabeth Baker, Glossary of Northamptonshire Words and Phrases, page 163:
      The rawk o' the hills, and the mist o' the mountains, / Like the reek o'a pot, and the smoke of a kiln, / Draws further off still, while the round sun is counting / His pulses o' light o' the morning so still.

Etymology 2Edit

Compare roke (defect in steel).

NounEdit

rawk (plural rawks)

  1. (UK, dialectal, possibly obsolete) A mark.
    • 1865, William Stott Banks, Wakefield Words:
      Rawks o' muck dahn't side on his faace.
    • 1896 June 27, Yorkshire Weekly Post:
      'At drew all them rawks.
    • 1943, Textile Colorist: A Monthly Journal Devoted to Practical Dyeing, Bleaching, Printing and Finishing, Dyes, Dyestuffs and Chemicals as Applied to Dyeing, volume 65, page 241:
      When the piece is on shade, cool down gradually and thoroughly to avoid “rawks []

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

rawk (plural rawks)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of rock. (music genre)
    I enjoy listening to good rawk.
    • [2005 May, Chuck Klosterman, “The Rock Lexicon”, in SPIN, page 61:
      RAWK: This is how people who start bands in order to meet porn stars spell rock.]

VerbEdit

rawk (third-person singular simple present rawks, present participle rawking, simple past and past participle rawked)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of rock.
    What do ya think 'bout it? It rawks!

AnagramsEdit