See also: Mark, Márk, and märk

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mark, merk, merke, from Old English mearc (mark, sign, line of division; standard; boundary, limit, term, border; defined area, district, province), from Proto-West Germanic *marku, from Proto-Germanic *markō (boundary; boundary marker), from Proto-Indo-European *marǵ- (edge, boundary, border).

Cognate with Dutch mark, merk (mark, brand), German Mark (mark; borderland), Swedish mark (mark, land, territory), Icelandic mark (mark, sign), Latin margo (edge, margin), Persian مرز(marz, limit, boundary), Sanskrit मर्या (maryā, limit, mark, boundary) and मार्ग (mārga, mark, section). Compare march.

NounEdit

mark (plural marks)

  1. (heading) Boundary, land within a boundary.
    1. (obsolete) A boundary; a border or frontier. [9th–19th c.]
    2. (obsolete) A boundary-post or fence. [13th–18th c.]
    3. A stone or post used to indicate position and guide travellers. [from 14th c.]
      • 1859, Henry Bull, A history, military and municipal, of the ancient borough of the Devizes:
        I do remember a great thron in Yatton field near Bristow-way, against which Sir William Waller's men made a great fire and killed it. I think the stump remains, and was a mark for travellers.
    4. (archaic) A type of small region or principality. [from 18th c.]
      • 1954, J R R Tolkien, The Two Towers:
        There dwells Théoden son of Thengel, King of the Mark of Rohan.
    5. (historical) A common, or area of common land, especially among early Germanic peoples. [from 19th c.]
  2. (heading) Characteristic, sign, visible impression.
    1. An omen; a symptomatic indicator of something. [from 8th c.]
      • 1813 January 27, [Jane Austen], Pride and Prejudice, volume (please specify |volume=I to III), London: [] [George Sidney] for T[homas] Egerton [], OCLC 38659585:
        depend upon it, you will speedily receive from me a letter of thanks for this as well as for every other mark of your regard during my stay in Hertfordshire.
    2. A characteristic feature. [from 16th c.]
      A good sense of manners is the mark of a true gentleman.
      • 1642, Tho[mas] Browne, “(please specify the page)”, in Religio Medici. [], 4th edition, London: [] E. Cotes for Andrew Crook [], published 1656, OCLC 927499620:
        there is surely a physiognomy, which those experienced and master mendicants observe, whereby they instantly discover a merciful aspect, and will single out a face, wherein they spy the signatures and marks of mercy.
    3. A visible impression or sign; a blemish, scratch, or stain, whether accidental or intentional. [from 9th c.]
    4. A sign or brand on a person. [from 10th c.]
      • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “III.iv.2.6”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970:
        Doubt not of thine election, it is an immutable decree; a mark never to be defaced: you have been otherwise, you may and shall be.
    5. A written character or sign. [from 10th c.]
      The font wasn't able to render all the diacritical marks properly.
    6. A stamp or other indication of provenance, quality etc. [from 11th c.]
      With eggs, you need to check for the quality mark before you buy.
      • 1876, Edward H. Knight, American Mechanical Dictionary
        The mark of the artisan is found upon the most ancient fabrics that have come to light.
    7. (obsolete) Resemblance, likeness, image. [14th–16th c.]
    8. A particular design or make of an item (now usually with following numeral). [from 15th c.]
      I am proud to present my patented travelator, mark two.
    9. A score for finding the correct answer, or other academic achievement; the sum of such points gained as out of a possible total. [from 19th c.]
      What mark did you get in your history test?
  3. (heading) Indicator of position, objective etc.
    1. A target for shooting at with a projectile. [from 13th c.]
      • , II.1:
        A skilfull archer ought first to know the marke he aimeth at, and then apply his hand, his bow, his string, his arrow and his motion accordingly.
      • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, p.37:
        To give them an accurate eye and strength of arm, none under twenty-four years of age might shoot at any standing mark, except it was for a rover, and then he was to change his mark at every shot; and no person above that age might shoot at any mark whose distance was less than eleven score yards.
    2. An indication or sign used for reference or measurement. [from 14th c.]
      I filled the bottle up to the 500ml mark.
    3. The target or intended victim of a swindle, fixed game or con game. [from 18th c.]
    4. (obsolete) The female genitals. [16th–18th c.]
    5. (Australian rules football) A catch of the ball directly from a kick of 10 metres or more without having been touched in transit, resulting in a free kick. [from 19th c.]
    6. (sports) The line indicating an athlete's starting-point. [from 19th c.]
    7. A score for a sporting achievement. [from 20th c.]
    8. An official note that is added to a record kept about someone's behavior or performance.
      • 1871, Chicago Board of Education, Annual Report (vol.17, p.102)
        A mark for tardiness or for absence is considered by most pupils a disgrace, and strenuous efforts are made to avoid such a mark.
    9. (cooking) A specified level on a scale denoting gas-powered oven temperatures. [from 20th c.]
      Now put the pastry in at 450 degrees, or mark 8.
    10. (product design/engineering) The model number of a device; a device model.
      The Mark I system had poor radar, and the Mark II was too expensive; regardless, most antiaircraft direction remained the responsibility of the Mark I Eyeball (as the jocular phrase calls it): that is, the operator's eye.
    11. Limit or standard of action or fact.
      to be within the mark
      to come up to the mark
    12. Badge or sign of honour, rank, or official station.
      • 1605, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Coriolanus:
        In the official marks invested, you / Anon do meet the Senate.
    13. (archaic) Preeminence; high position.
      patricians of mark
      a fellow of no mark
    14. (logic) A characteristic or essential attribute; a differential.
    15. (nautical) One of the bits of leather or coloured bunting placed upon a sounding line at intervals of from two to five fathoms. (The unmarked fathoms are called "deeps".)
  4. (heading) Attention.
    • 1604, William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure:
      But faults so countenanced, that the strong statutes Stand like the forfeits in a barber's shop, as much in mock as mark
    1. (archaic) Attention, notice. [from 15th c.]
      His last comment is particularly worthy of mark.
    2. Importance, noteworthiness. (Generally in postmodifier “of mark”.) [from 16th c.]
      • 1909, Richard Burton, Masters of the English Novel:
        in the short story of western flavor he was a pioneer of mark, the founder of a genre: probably no other writer is so significant in his field.
    3. (obsolete) Regard; respect.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
DescendantsEdit
  • Chinese:
    • Cantonese: (mak1)
  • Japanese: マーク (māku)
  • Korean: 마크 (makeu)

VerbEdit

mark (third-person singular simple present marks, present participle marking, simple past and past participle marked)

  1. To put a mark on (something); to make (something) recognizable by a mark; to label or write on (something).
    to mark a box or bale of merchandise
    to mark clothing with one's name
  2. To leave a mark (often an undesirable or unwanted one) on (something).
    Synonyms: blemish, scar, scratch, stain
    See where this pencil has marked the paper.
    The floor was marked with wine and blood.
    • 1717, Alexander Pope (translator), The Iliad of Homer, London: Bernard Lintott, Volume 3, Book 12, p. 229,[3]
      Those Wheels returning ne’er shall mark the Plain;
    • 1855, Frederick Douglass, “speech given on 12 May, 1846”, in My Bondage and My Freedom, New York: Miller, Orton and Mulligan, Appendix, page 410:
      Advertisements are from time to time inserted, stating that slaves have escaped [] marked with the lash, branded with red-hot irons, the initials of their master’s name burned into their flesh;
  3. (figuratively) To have a long-lasting negative impact on (someone or something).
    • 1939, John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath, Penguin, 1976, Chapter 10, p. 104,[4]
      The death of his wife, followed by months of being alone, had marked him with guilt and shame and had left an unbreaking loneliness on him.
    • 1998, Octavia Butler, Parable of the Talents, New York: Seven Stories Press, p. 279,[5]
      What Uncle Marc had been through as a slave marked him, I’m sure, but I don’t know how much. How can you know what a man would be like if he had grown up unmarked by horror?
    • 2013 June 7, Joseph Stiglitz, “Globalisation is about taxes too”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 19:
      It is time the international community faced the reality: we have an unmanageable, unfair, distortionary global tax regime. It is a tax system that is pivotal in creating the increasing inequality that marks most advanced countries today […].
  4. To create an indication of (a location).
    She folded over the corner of the page to mark where she left off reading.
    Some animals mark their territory by urinating.
  5. To be an indication of (something); to show where (something) is located.
    This monument marks the spot where Wolfe died.
    A bell marked the end of visiting hours.
    Synonyms: demonstrate, indicate, manifest, reveal, show, signal
  6. To indicate (something) in writing or by other symbols.
    Prices are marked on individual items.
    In her Bible, the words of Christ were marked in red.
    Synonyms: display, show, write
  7. To create (a mark) on a surface.
    Synonyms: draw, trace
  8. To celebrate or acknowledge (an event) through an action of some kind.
    The national holiday is marked by fireworks.
    Synonyms: commemorate, solemnize
  9. (of things) To identify (someone as a particular type of person or as having a particular role).
    His courage and energy marked him as a leader.
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma, London: John Murray, Volume 2, Chapter 8, p. 134,[13]
      [] the son approached her with a cheerful eagerness which marked her as his peculiar object,
    • 1901, Rudyard Kipling, Kim, London: Macmillan, 1902, Chapter 5, p. 115,[14]
      The black dress, gold cross on the watch-chain, the hairless face, and the soft, black wideawake hat would have marked him as a holy man anywhere in all India.
    • 1968, Bessie Head, When Rain Clouds Gather, Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press, 2013, Chapter 1, p. 1,[15]
      His long thin falling-away cheekbones marked him as a member of either the Xhosa or Zulu tribe.
    • 2016, Julian Barnes, The Noise of Time, Random House, Prologue,[16]
      Enquiring about the movement of trains—even if you were a passenger on one—could mark you as a saboteur.
  10. (of people) To assign (someone) to a particular category or class.
    Synonyms: classify, mark out
    • 1951, Herman Wouk, The Caine Mutiny, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Part 2, Chapter 10, p. 113,[17]
      The new captain would read the fitness report and mark him once and for all as an unreliable fool []
  11. (of people) To choose or intend (someone) for a particular end or purpose.
    Synonyms: destine, mark out, target
    • c. 1611, George Chapman (translator), The Iliads of Homer, London: Nathaniel Butter, Book 1, p. 3,[18]
      When a king, hath once markt for his hate, / A man inferior; [] / [] euermore, he rakes vp in his brest, / Brands of quicke anger;
    • 1970, Saul Bellow, Mr. Sammler’s Planet, New York: Viking, Chapter 5, p. 230,[19]
      [] I know now that humankind marks certain people for death.
  12. To be a point in time or space at which something takes place; to accompany or be accompanied by (an event, action, etc.); to coincide with.
    The creek marks the boundary between the two farms.
    That summer marked the beginning of her obsession with cycling.
    Synonyms: represent, see
    • 1912, Edgar Rice Burroughs, A Princess of Mars, New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1917, Chapter 16, p. 172,[20]
      [] we hastened toward the bordering desert which marked our entrance into the realm of Tal Hajus.
    • 1962, Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, Chapter 3, p. 17,[21]
      Although the Second World War marked a turning away from inorganic chemicals as pesticides into the wonder world of the carbon molecule, a few of the old materials persist.
    • 2002, Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex, New York: Farrar, Straux, Giroux, p. 93,[22]
      My grandfather’s short employ at the Ford Motor Company marked the only time any Stephanides has ever worked in the automobile industry.
  13. To be typical or characteristic of (something).
    Synonyms: characterize, typify
  14. To distinguish (one person or thing from another).
    • 1823 July 15, [Lord Byron], Don Juan. Cantos VI.—VII.—and VIII., London: [] [C. H. Reynell] for John Hunt, [], OCLC 22683670, canto VIII, stanza 130, page 313:
      Indeed the smoke was such they scarce could mark
      Their friends from foes,
    • 1943, Maurice Bowra, The Heritage of Symbolism, London: Macmillan, 1954, Chapter 1, p. 2,[25]
      Despite their obvious differences these poets had a common view of life which marks them from their predecessors []
    • 1983, Elizabeth George Speare, The Sign of the Beaver, New York: Dell, 1984, Chapter 24, p. 127,[26]
      Each day was so like the day before, and Christmas Day, when it came, would not have anything to mark it from all the others.
  15. (dated except in the phrase "mark my words") To focus one's attention on (something or someone); to pay attention to, to take note of.
    Synonyms: heed, listen to, look at, observe, watch
    Mark my words: that boy’s up to no good.
  16. (dated) To become aware of (something) through the physical senses.
    Synonyms: hear, note, notice, observe, perceive, see
    • 1726 October 28, [Jonathan Swift], Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. [] [Gulliver’s Travels], London: [] Benj[amin] Motte, [], OCLC 995220039, (please specify |part=I, II, III or IV), page 1:
      Some of them [the Animals] coming forward near the place where I lay, gave me an opportunity of distinctly marking their Form.
    • 1838 March – 1839 October, Charles Dickens, chapter 53, in The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, London: Chapman and Hall, [], published 1839, OCLC 1057107260, page 525:
      He bent his eyes involuntarily upon the father as he spoke, and marked his uneasiness, for he coloured directly and turned his head away.
    • 1881, John Bascom, “Improvements in Language” in The Western: A Journal of Literature, Education, and Art, New Series, Volume 7, No. 6, December, 1881, p. 499,[29]
      [] it is to be remembered that a poor speller is a poor pronouncer. The ear does not mark the sound any more exactly than the eye marks the letters.
    • 1955, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Return of the King, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965, Appendix A, pp. 347-348,[30]
      Helm had a great horn, and soon it was marked that before he sallied forth he would blow a blast upon it that echoed in the Deep;
  17. To hold (someone) in one's line of sight.
    • 1956, Mary Renault, The Last of the Wine, New York: Pantheon, Chapter 22, p. 268,[31]
      I marked my man, standing on the catwalk, and waited to throw [my javelin] till he started to climb inboard before they rammed.
  18. To indicate the correctness of and give a score to (a school assignment, exam answers, etc.).
    The teacher had to spend her weekend marking all the tests.
    Synonyms: grade, score
  19. To record that (someone) has a particular status.
    to mark a student absent.
  20. (transitive, intransitive) To keep account of; to enumerate and register; to keep score.
    to mark the points in a game of billiards or a card game
  21. (sports) To follow a player not in possession of the ball when defending, to prevent them receiving a pass easily.
  22. (Australian rules football) To catch the ball directly from a kick of 15 metres or more without having been touched in transit, resulting in a free kick.
  23. (golf) To put a marker in the place of one's ball.
  24. (singing) To sing softly, sometimes an octave lower than usual, in order to protect one's voice during a rehearsal.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English mark, from Old English marc (a denomination of weight (usu. half a pound), mark (money of account)), from Proto-Germanic *marką (mark, sign), from Proto-Indo-European *marǵ- (edge, boundary, border). Cognate with Dutch mark (mark), German Mark (a weight of silver, a coin), Swedish mark (a stamped coin), Icelandic mörk (a weight (usu. a pound) of silver or gold).

NounEdit

mark (plural marks)

  1. A measure of weight (especially for gold and silver), once used throughout Europe, equivalent to 8 oz.
    • 1997, Bernard Scudder, translating ‘Egil's Saga’, in The Sagas of Icelanders, Penguin 2001, page 91:
      As a reward for his poetry, Athelstan gave Egil two more gold rings weighing a mark each, along with an expensive cloak that the king himself had worn.
  2. (now historical) An English and Scottish unit of currency (originally valued at one mark weight of silver), equivalent to 13 shillings and fourpence.
    • 1824, James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Oxford 2010, p. 42:
      George, on receiving it, instantly rose from the side of one of them, and said, in the hearing of them all, ‘I will bet a hundred merks that is Drummond.’
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, page 167:
      He had been made a royal counsellor, drawing a substantial annual salary of a hundred marks.
  3. Any of various European monetary units, especially the base unit of currency of (West) Germany between 1948 and 2002, equal to 100 pfennigs.
  4. A coin worth one mark.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

An alternate form supposedly easier to pronounce while giving commands.

VerbEdit

mark

  1. (imperative, marching) Alternative form of march.
    Mark time, mark!
    Forward, mark!

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch markt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mark (plural markte or marke)

  1. market

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mark/, [ˈmɑːɡ̊]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse mǫrk (wilderness), from Proto-Germanic *markō (border, marker), cognate with German Mark f (border land, marches).

NounEdit

mark c (singular definite marken, plural indefinite marker)

  1. field (wide, open space used to grow crops or to hold farm animals)
    Synonym: ager
InflectionEdit
See alsoEdit
  • eng (meadow, uncultivated open space)

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mǫrk, from Proto-Germanic *markō (border, marker), cognate with German Mark f (currency), originally the same word as the previous one.

NounEdit

mark c (singular definite marken, plural indefinite mark)

  1. (historical) mark (unit of currency, in Denmark from the Middle Ages until 1875, in Germany and Finland until 2002)
  2. (historical) mark (unit of weight, especially of precious metals, equivalent to half a pound or 8 ounces)
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch marke, from Old Dutch [Term?]. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mark f (plural marken)

  1. (chiefly historical) A march, a mark (border region).

Derived termsEdit


EstonianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From German Marke.

NounEdit

mark (genitive margi, partitive marki)

  1. mark (a sign or brand)
  2. tally mark
  3. stamp (postage stamp)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *markō.

NounEdit

mark (genitive marga, partitive marka)

  1. mark (currency)
DeclensionEdit

FaroeseEdit

NounEdit

mark f (genitive singular markar, plural markir)

  1. (kvæði) forest
    Synonyms: mørk, skógur
  2. (in phrases) pasture
    Synonym: hagi
  3. (biblical) field
    Synonym: bøur

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mark
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative mark markin markir markirnar
accusative mark markina markir markirnar
dative mark markini markum markunum
genitive markar markarinnar marka markanna

NounEdit

mark n (genitive singular marks, plural mørk)

  1. sign
    Synonym: merki
  2. border, frontier

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mark
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative mark markið mark markini
accusative mark markið mark markini
dative marki markinum markum markunum
genitive marks marksins marka markanna
Declension of mark
n5 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative mark markið mørk mørkini
accusative mark markið mørk mørkini
dative marki markinum mørkum mørkunum
genitive marks marksins marka markanna

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mark m (plural marks)

  1. mark (currency)

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mark, from Proto-Germanic *marką.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mark n (genitive singular marks, nominative plural mörk)

  1. sign, mark
  2. target, aim, mark
  3. (sports) goal
  4. (numismatics) mark

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse maðkr

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mark m (definite singular marken, indefinite plural marker, definite plural markene)

  1. a worm (invertebrate)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mǫrk

NounEdit

mark f or m (definite singular marka or marken, indefinite plural marker, definite plural markene)

  1. land, ground, field
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse mǫrk.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mark f (definite singular marka, indefinite plural marker, definite plural markene)

  1. land, field
  2. terrain
  3. ground
  4. (historical) march
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mǫrk.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mark f (definite singular marka, indefinite plural merker or (currency) mark, definite plural merker)

  1. a unit of measure equivalent to 250 grams
  2. (numismatics, historical) a mark
    det kosta 50 markit cost 50 marks
    1. any of various European monetary units, including in Finland (1861-1999) and Germany (1948-1999)
    2. (numismatics, historical) an old Norwegian coin
      1. (in the middle ages) a coin worth 8 øre
      2. (19th century) a coin worth 24 shillings or 1/5 taler
        Synonym: ort
  3. (historical) a Norwegian unit used to measure the taxability of property
Usage notesEdit
  • The indefinite plural is usually merker, but in the sense of a unit of currency, mark might be used instead.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse maðkr.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mark m (definite singular marken, indefinite plural markar, definite plural markane)

  1. a worm (invertebrate)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old Norse mark n.

NounEdit

mark n (definite singular market, indefinite plural mark, definite plural marka)

  1. a mark
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mǫrk, from Proto-Germanic *markō.

NounEdit

mark f

  1. woodland
  2. field

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish mark, from Old Norse mǫrk, from Proto-Germanic *markō, from Proto-Indo-European *marǵ- (edge, boundary, border). Cognate with Latin margo (border, edge), Old Irish mruig, bruig (border, march).

PronunciationEdit

  • (singular)
  • (plural)
    • IPA(key): (gambling sense) /ˈmarkɛr/
    • IPA(key): (other senses) /ˈmarˌkɛr/

NounEdit

mark c or f

  1. (uncountable) ground (as opposed to the sky or the sea)
    Ha fast mark under fötterna - to be on terra firma (literally "to have firm ground under (one's) feet")
    Tillbaka på klassisk mark - back on classical ground
    På engelsk mark - on English soil
  2. (countable, uncountable) ground, field
    Bonden ägde mycket mark - The farmer owned a lot of land
  3. mark (currency)
  4. (gambling) counter, marker

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mark 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mark marken marker markerna
Genitive marks markens markers markernas

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse maðkr.

NounEdit

mark m (definite singular martjen, dative martjåm, definite plural marka or markan)

  1. a worm (invertebrate)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mǫrk.

NounEdit

mark f (definite singular marka or markä, dative marken)

  1. Forest, woodland; ground.[1]
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Rietz, Johan Ernst, “MARK”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 432