redolent

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English redolent (first attested in 1400), from Old French redolent, from Latin redolentem, present participle of redoleō (I emit a scent), from red- + oleō (I smell).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

redolent (comparative more redolent, superlative most redolent)

  1. Fragrant or aromatic; having a sweet scent.
  2. Having the smell of the article in question.
    • 1861, Francis Colburn Adams, An Outcast, ch. 32:
      His breath is already redolent of whiskey.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[[Episode 16]]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483:
      Stephen, that is when the accosting figure came to close quarters, though he was not in an over sober state himself recognised Corley's breath redolent of rotten cornjuice.
  3. (idiomatic) Suggestive or reminiscent.
    • 1919, Ella Wheeler Wilcox, A vision:
      But forth from sweat-shops, tenement and prison
      Wailed minor protests, redolent with pain.
    • 1926, H.P. Lovecraft, The Call of Cthulhu:
      He said that the geometry of the dream-place he saw was abnormal, non-Euclidean, and loathsomely redolent of spheres and dimensions apart from ours.

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LatinEdit

VerbEdit

redolent

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of redoleō : 'they smell' ( - intransitive - i.e. 'they emit / diffuse an odour' ).