See also: vón, vốn, Vón, vȯņ, vōn, вон, and вонь

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably ultimately from a derivative of Latin avus, or a related term, possibly a diminutive. Compare Italian avo, avolo. Cf. also archaic Romanian bun (grandfather) (modern bunic), Calabrian Sicilian and Piedmontese bona (grandmother).

NounEdit

von m (plural vons)

  1. grandfather
    Synonym: nono

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German von (from), from Old High German fon, fona (from), from Proto-Germanic *afanē, *fanē, *funē (from), compound of *afa (from Proto-Indo-European *h₂epó (from, off)) + *ana (from Proto-Indo-European *h₂en- (on)). Cognate with Old Saxon fana, fan (from), Dutch van (from; of), Old Frisian fon (from).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fɔn/, [fɔn]
  • (file)

PrepositionEdit

von (+ dative)

  1. from
    Ich fahre von Köln nach Hamburg.
    I'm travelling from Cologne to Hamburg.
    Ich hab’s von meiner Schwester gehört.
    I heard it from my sister.
  2. of, belonging to (often replacing genitive; see usage note below)
    das Auto von meinem Vatermy father’s car / the car of my father
  3. by (with passive voice)
    Synonym: durch
    Das Hotel wird von der Firma bezahlt.
    The hotel is paid for by the company.
  4. about, of (a topic)
    Er hat von seiner Jugend erzählt.
    He told about his youth.
    • 1796, Abraham Sahlstedt, Schwedische Grammatik nach dem Sprachgebrauch unserer Zeiten, Lübeck & Leipzig, page 259:
      Von dem Nomine Substantivo, oder dem Hauptworte.
      About the substantive noun, or the [alternative term]. (headline)
  5. on, with (a resource)
    Von welchem Geld soll ich als Arbeitsloser in Urlaub fahren?
    Being unemployed, on what money should I go on holidays?
    Man kann nicht nur von Luft und Liebe leben.
    You can’t live on air and love alone. (proverb)

Usage notesEdit

  • (from): English “from” is generally expressed by means of von, but aus is often used with words for settlements and territories (like Land, Stadt, Dorf, as well as geographical names). One uses von when both the places “from which” and “to which” are given: Dieser Zug fährt von Köln nach Hamburg. – “This train goes from Cologne to Hamburg.” If the further direction is not given, aus is the normal choice: Dieser Zug kommt aus Köln. – “This train is coming from Cologne.” The phrase: Dieser Zug kommt von Köln is not wrong but has a colloquial ring to it.
  • (of): The preposition von is used to replace possessive and partitive genitives, sometimes also genitives with prepositions. Such replacement can be obligatory, optional, or restricted to the colloquial register:
It is obligatory if the genitive cannot be expressed grammatically, which is the case with common nouns not preceded by any declinable articles, determiners, or adjectives: die Rechte von Kindern (“children’s rights”); der Geschmack von Käse (“the taste of cheese”). It is also true of most singular pronouns and all personal pronouns: der Geschmack von diesem (“the taste of this”); ein Freund von mir (“a friend of mine”).
The replacement is optional in cases such as the following: 1.) with those pronouns that do have an applicable genitive form, chiefly plurals: die Arbeit vieler = die Arbeit von vielen (“the work of many”); 2.) with the numeral genitives zweier and dreier (see lemmas); 3.) with proper nouns, particularly geographical names: die Kirchen Roms = die Kirchen von Rom (“the churches of Rome”); 4.) with common nouns preceded only by an adjective: die Rechte kleiner Kinder = die Rechte von kleinen Kindern (“small children’s rights”).
The replacement is colloquial in most other cases. Any possessive or partitive genitive can, per se, be replaced with a von-phrase, which is normal in speech, and virtually obligatory in colloquial speech. In formal writing, however, it is generally considered incorrect and unusual. This is one of the gravest grammatical differences between colloquial and literary German.
  • In older usage, Latin nouns often occurred in the ablative case after von. This is now obsolete, Latin case inflections never being used in contemporary German (except the genitives of a few personal names).

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ ˈvon]
  • Hyphenation: von
  • Rhymes: -on

Etymology 1Edit

Of unknown origin.[1]

VerbEdit

von

  1. (transitive) to pull, draw, attract
    Synonym: húz
    felvonta a vitorláthe hoisted the sails (literally, “he pulled/drew up the sails”)
    félrevonta a barátjátshe drew/pulled her friend aside
    magához vonta a lánythe drew/pulled her closer to himself
    magára vonta a tanára figyelméthe drew/attracted his teacher’s attention
  2. (transitive) to cover, envelop, enclose, encircle, surround
    Synonyms: fed, befed, beborít
    csokoládéval vonta be a felszínétshe covered its surface with chocolate
    élőláncot vontak az épület köréthey formed a human chain around the building (literally, “they enclosed the building with…”)
    a varázsló pajzsot vont maga köréthe wizard surrounded himself with a shield
ConjugationEdit
Usage notesEdit

Many terms formed with von are rendered in English with -tract, e.g. elvon (to abstract), összevon (to contract), levon (to detract), elvon (to distract), kivon (to extract, subtract), and visszavon (to retract).

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

(Expressions):

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Korean (won, also in hanja), from Sinitic (yuán, “circle” > “round coin”).

NounEdit

von

  1. won (currency)
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative von vonok
accusative vont vonokat
dative vonnak vonoknak
instrumental vonnal vonokkal
causal-final vonért vonokért
translative vonná vonokká
terminative vonig vonokig
essive-formal vonként vonokként
essive-modal
inessive vonban vonokban
superessive vonon vonokon
adessive vonnál vonoknál
illative vonba vonokba
sublative vonra vonokra
allative vonhoz vonokhoz
elative vonból vonokból
delative vonról vonokról
ablative vontól vonoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
voné vonoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
vonéi vonokéi
Possessive forms of von
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. vonom vonjaim
2nd person sing. vonod vonjaid
3rd person sing. vonja vonjai
1st person plural vonunk vonjaink
2nd person plural vonotok vonjaitok
3rd person plural vonjuk vonjaik

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • von in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ván, from Proto-Germanic *wēniz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

von f (genitive singular vonar, nominative plural vonir)

  1. hope, expectation

DeclensionEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ván, vón, ón

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

von f (definite singular vona, indefinite plural voner, definite plural vonene)

  1. hope
    Synonym: håp
  2. expectation

ReferencesEdit


RomaniEdit

PronounEdit

von

  1. they

See alsoEdit


SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

von

  1. out, outwards

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German von.

PrepositionEdit

von

  1. of; only used in surnames of nobility
    Synonyms: af, de
    Carl von Linné
    Carl Linnaeus

AnagramsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vúːn/, [ʋɯ̞́ᵝŋn], [ʋɯ́ᵝːɳ], [ʋóʊ̯ːn] (example of pronunciation)
    Rhymes: -úːn

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse ván.

NounEdit

von f (definite singular vona)

  1. Hope, expectation that something will happen, opportunity.
    Dräp ej vona!
    Don't lose hope!
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

von f (definite singular vona, plural voon, definite plural vonen)

  1. (agriculture) A determined task, undertaking.
    1. A distance of a field or meadow, of which every worker takes on their share for harvesting
    2. The width of a scythe, or his part of the field, that a haymaker mows where he walks.
    3. As great a width of the field strip, as the sowing man sows in the direction he is going.
  2. Synonym of vone.
Derived termsEdit
  • slottervon
  • sävon (the part or the width of the field, which is delegated to the one who sows)

ReferencesEdit

  • Rietz, Johan Ernst, “von”, “von”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 822, 840