Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman rivage, Middle French rivage, from rive + -age.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rivage (plural rivages)

  1. (now rare, poetic) A coast, a shore.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xxj, in Le Morte Darthur, book XVII:
      Ryght soo departed Galahad / Percyual / and Bors with hym / and soo they rode thre dayes / and thenne they came to a Ryuage and fonde the shyp [] / And whanne they cam to the borde / they fonde in the myddes the table of syluer / whiche they had lefte with the maymed kynge and the Sancgreal whiche was couerd with rede samyte
    • 1892, Michael Field, "The Death of Procris"
      ...leaves have taken flight
      From yon
      Slim seedling-birch on the rivage, the flock
      Of herons has the quiet of solitude...
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
    • Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892)
      From the green rivage many a fall / Of diamond rillets musical.
  2. (law, Britain, historical) A duty paid to the crown for the passage of vessels on certain rivers.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

rive +‎ -age

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rivage m (plural rivages)

  1. bank; shore; coast

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

rivage m (oblique plural rivages, nominative singular rivages, nominative plural rivage)

  1. riverbank or shore

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit