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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
Homemade rouille

Borrowed from French rouille (rouille (sauce); rust); the sauce is so named because its colour resembles that of rust.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rouille (countable and uncountable, plural rouilles)

  1. (cooking) A type of sauce from Provence, France, often served with fish dishes, consisting of olive oil with breadcrumbs, chili peppers, garlic, and saffron.
    • 1958, Alice B[abette] Toklas, “Soups”, in Aromas and Flavors of Past and Present, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, OCLC 1321430; republished New York, N.Y.: The Lyons Press, 1996, →ISBN, page 5:
      Serve with grated Parmesan cheese and a rouille sauce [...].
    • 1975, Irma S[tarkloff] Rombauer; Marion Rombauer Becker, “Savory Sauces and Salad Dressings”, in Joy of Cooking, 1st Scribner edition, New York, N.Y.: Scribner, published 1995, →ISBN, page 366, column 1:
      ROUILLE SAUCE / Strongly flavored, served with fish soups or bouillabaisse.
    • 2003, Michael A. Kornfield, “Sauces”, in Table for Two in Paris: Cookbook & Music CD, White Plains, N.Y.: Peter Pauper Press, →ISBN, page 36:
      Rouille: Garlic, Saffron, and Pepper Mayonnaise [...] After you have added a few drops of oil, add saffron and a pinch of cayenne. Gradually whisk in remaining oil in a slow, thin stream until sauce is thickened to a mayonnaise consistency. Taste the rouille and add additional cayenne, if desired.
    • 2003, John Weston, “Or a Snake when He Asks for Fish”, in Dining at the Lineman’s Shack, Tucson, Ariz.: University of Arizona Press, →ISBN, page 41:
      In the Northwest one finds fritters coated with not-too-finely ground hazelnuts, with crab on the inside; in that case called crab cakes, spiked with chopped scallion and bell or hot red pepper, served with rouilles of mustard and racy mayonnaise.
    • 2010 April, Sara Moulton, “Plenty of Poultry”, in Sara Moulton’s Everyday Family Dinners, New York, N.Y.: Simon & Schuster, →ISBN, page 174:
      Chicken bouillabaisse with Rouille [...] I'm taking some liberties by calling this recipe a bouillabaisse. The classic recipe, of course, is a venerable fish stew that originated in Marseille. It's flavored with saffron and garnished with a rouille sauce. [...] To serve, divide the bouillabaisse among 4 soup plates and top with the Rouille.

TranslationsEdit

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Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French reoïlle, from Vulgar Latin *robicla, from syncopation of Latin *robicula, a diminutive of Latin rōbīgō (rust) + -cula (from -culus (suffix forming diminutives)).[1] Rōbīgō is derived from rōbus (a variant of rūfus (red, reddish)) + -īgō (suffix forming nouns usually denoting diseased conditions). Compare Catalan rovell, Occitan rovilh.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rouille (plural rouilles)

  1. (color) rust

NounEdit

rouille f (plural rouilles)

  1. rust (oxidation of iron)
  2. rust (fungus disease of plants)
  3. (cooking) rouille (provençal sauce)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ rouille, n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2011.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit