See also: rüst, růst, Rust, and rúst

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Rust
 
Rust on a can

Pronunciation

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  • enPR: rŭst, IPA(key): /ɹʌst/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌst

Etymology 1

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From Middle English rust, rost, roust, from Old English rust, rūst (rust), from Proto-West Germanic *rust, from Proto-Germanic *rustaz (rust), from Proto-Indo-European *rudʰso- (red), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ- (red).

Cognate with Scots roust (rust), Saterland Frisian rust (rust), West Frisian roast (rust), Dutch roest (rust), German Rost (rust), Danish rust (rust), Swedish rost (rust), Norwegian rust, ryst (rust), Finnish ruoste, Estonian rooste. Related to red.

Noun

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rust (countable and uncountable, plural rusts)

  1. The deteriorated state of iron or steel as a result of moisture and oxidation.
    The rust on my bicycle chain made cycling to work very dangerous.
  2. A similar substance based on another metal.
    copper rust
  3. A reddish-brown color.
    rust:  
  4. A disease of plants caused by a reddish-brown fungus.
  5. (philately) Damage caused to stamps and album pages by a fungal infection.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 2

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A rusting leaf.
 
A black cat that has rusted.

From Middle English rusten, from the noun (see above).

Verb

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rust (third-person singular simple present rusts, present participle rusting, simple past and past participle rusted)

  1. (intransitive) To oxidize, especially of iron or steel.
    The patio furniture had rusted in the wind-driven spray.
  2. (transitive) To cause to oxidize.
    The wind-driven spray had thoroughly rusted the patio furniture.
  3. (intransitive) To be affected with the parasitic fungus called rust.
    • 1902 January 3, “Mapstone Oats: Further Experiences”, in The Agricultural Journal and Mining Record[1], volume 4, number 22, page 688:
      I am sorry to say that, contrary to the majority, I have to report that the forage rusted rather badly.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, figuratively) To (cause to) degenerate in idleness; to make or become dull or impaired by inaction.
    • 1692, John Dryden, Cleomenes, the Spartan Hero, a Tragedy:
      Must I rust in Egypt? never more / Appear in arms, and be the chief of Greece?
  5. (intransitive) Of a black cat or its fur, to turn rust-coloured following long periods of exposure to sunlight.
    It's very common for black cats to rust during the summer.
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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See also
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References

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  • rust”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Anagrams

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Danish

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Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology

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From Old Swedish rost (rust), from Old Norse *rustr, possibly borrowed from Old Saxon rost, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *rustaz.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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rust c (singular definite rusten, not used in plural form)

  1. rust
  2. corrosion

Verb

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rust

  1. imperative of ruste

Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Dutch ruste, from Old Dutch *rusta, from Proto-Germanic *rustijō. Cognate with German Low German Rüst (rest), German Rüste (end, sunset).

Noun

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rust f (plural rusten)

  1. rest, calm, peace
    Waarom laat je me niet met rust?
    Why don't you leave me alone?
    (literally, “Why don't you leave me at rest?”)
  2. (sports) half-time
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Negerhollands: rust, res

Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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rust

  1. inflection of rusten:
    1. first/second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Further reading

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  • rust” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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From Old English rust, rūst, from Proto-West Germanic *rust, *rost, from Proto-Germanic *rustaz.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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rust (uncountable)

  1. rust (oxidisation of iron or steel)
  2. (figurative) Moral degeneration.
  3. (horticulture) A fungal disease of plants.
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Descendants
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References
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Etymology 2

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Verb

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rust

  1. Alternative form of rusten

Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
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Noun

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rust m or f (definite singular rusta or rusten) (uncountable)

  1. rust (oxidation of iron and steel)
  2. rust (disease affecting plants)

Derived terms

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Verb

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rust

  1. imperative of ruste

Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology 1

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Proto-Germanic *rustaz.

Alternative forms

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  • røst (Trøndelag dialect)

Pronunciation

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Noun

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rust f (definite singular rusta) (uncountable)

  1. rust (oxidation, as above)
  2. rust (plant disease)

Verb

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rust

  1. imperative of rusta

Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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rust

  1. past participle of rusa

References

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Old English

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *rust, from Proto-Germanic *rustaz (rust), from Proto-Indo-European *rudʰso- (red), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ- (red).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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rust m

  1. rust

Derived terms

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Descendants

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