See also: säie

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

saie

  1. Archaic spelling of say.
    • 1594, Thomas Nash, The Vnfortunate Traveller, or The Life Of Jack Wilton[1]:
      What stratagemicall actes and monuments do you thinke an ingenious infant of my age might enact? you will saie, it were sufficient if he slurre a die, pawne his master to the vtmost pennie, & minister the oath on the pantoffle arteficially.
    • 1602, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor[2]:
      By the Lord thou art a traitor to saie so: What made me loue thee?

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *sagia, from Latin sagum, from Gaulish *sagos, or from Ancient Greek σάγος (ságos).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

saie f (plural saies)

  1. a short garment worn by ancient Persians, Romans, and Gauls in combat

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ManxEdit

NounEdit

saie m (genitive singular [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. satiety, fill
  2. satisfaction

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
saie haie
after "yn", taie
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

saie

  1. replete

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
saie haie
after "yn", taie
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

SynonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

saie

  1. Alternative form of assayen