scintilla

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Existing in English since the seventeenth century[1]; from Latin scintilla ‎(sparkling speck, atom).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scintilla ‎(plural scintillae or scintillas)

  1. A small spark or flash.
    • 1890, Philosophical Magazine, page 364,
      If the action of the electrodynamic waves is so violent that, even without artificial electrification of the secondary conductor, scintillæ occur in its spark-gap, the aluminium leaves remain almost without change.
  2. A small or trace amount.

TranslationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Concise Oxford English Dictionary [Eleventh Edition]

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

scintilla

  1. third-person singular past historic of scintiller

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin scintilla.

NounEdit

scintilla f ‎(plural scintille)

  1. spark

VerbEdit

scintilla

  1. third-person singular present of scintillare
  2. second-person singular imperative of scintillare

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Most likely from Proto-Indo-European *ski-nto-, from *skai-, *ski- ‎(to gleam, shine), which is the source of English shine.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scintilla f ‎(genitive scintillae); first declension

  1. spark
    • Quintus Curtius Rufus, Historiarum Alexandri Magni Macedonis Libri Qui Supersunt; Book VI, Chapter III
      Parva saepe scintilla contempta magnum excitavit incendium.
      A small spark neglected has often roused to a great inferno.
  2. glimmer

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative scintilla scintillae
genitive scintillae scintillārum
dative scintillae scintillīs
accusative scintillam scintillās
ablative scintillā scintillīs
vocative scintilla scintillae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

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