See also: Brin and brīn

English edit

Etymology edit

Of unknown origin ; perhaps French brin

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɹɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

Noun edit

brin (plural brins)

  1. One of the radiating sticks of a fan. The outermost are larger and longer, and are called panaches.[1]
  2. A single silkworm thread extruded from the gland, before it has formed a bave.

References edit

  1. ^ Edward H[enry] Knight (1877) “Brin”, in Knight’s American Mechanical Dictionary. [], volumes I (A–GAS), New York, N.Y.: Hurd and Houghton [], →OCLC.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Unknown origin; possibly of Gaulish origin (compare Catalan bri, Spanish brenca (fiber), brinza (blade of grass, filament)), from Proto-Celtic *brinikā, from *brinos (filament, fiber) (compare Breton broenenn, Welsh brwynen), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrugh-no- (twig), perhaps related to the root of English brush.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

brin m (plural brins)

  1. blade (of grass)
  2. sprig, twig
  3. wisp, strand (of hair, fibre etc.)
  4. (figuratively) ounce, bit, hint

See also edit

References edit

  • Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN, p. 257, 258
  • brin”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.
  • Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN
  • Remacle, Louis (1984): La différenciation des géminées mm, nn en mb, nd: sur l'étymologie des termes landon et flamber et des toponymes hambê, hambâ, p. 45
  • brin”, in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014
  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “brwyn”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Further reading edit

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *brūnaz (brown), from Proto-Indo-European *bher- (shining, brown).

Adjective edit

brin m (feminine singular brina, masculine plural brins, feminine plural brinas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) brown

Slovene edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *brinъ (sp. of conifer). Compare Serbo-Croatian brȋn, Polish brzyn. Maybe related to Ancient Greek πρῖνος (prînos, holm oak).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

brȉn m inan

  1. juniper

Inflection edit

 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. brìn
gen. sing. brína
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
brìn brína bríni
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
brína brínov brínov
dative
(dajȃlnik)
brínu brínoma brínom
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
brìn brína bríne
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
brínu brínih brínih
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
brínom brínoma bríni

Further reading edit

  • brin”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Welsh edit

Adjective edit

brin

  1. Soft mutation of prin.

Adverb edit

brin

  1. Soft mutation of prin.

Noun edit

brin

  1. Soft mutation of prin.

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
prin brin mhrin phrin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.