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See also: shát

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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A late innovation, apparently by analogy with sitsat; spitspat, etc.[1][2] First recorded in the eighteenth century.[3]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

shat

  1. simple past tense and past participle of shit

Etymology 2Edit

Arabic شَطّ(šaṭṭ); see chott; for the spelling, compare Shatt al-Arab.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

shat (plural shats)

  1. Alternative form of chott
    • 1902, The Encyclopaedia Britannica, Tenth Edition; [] , page 482:
      All this region round the shats has been called the “Jerid” from the time of the Arab occupation.

Etymology 3Edit

Sometimes said to be a shortening of an obsolete word (*)shattle (needle),[5][6] but more likely a shortening of the synonymous (pine) shatter.[7]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

shat (plural shats)

  1. (chiefly Maryland, Delaware) Synonym of shatter (a pine needle).
    • 1921, Whitelock vs Dennis (decision on appeal), in the Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Court of Appeals of Maryland, page 559:
      Dryden used the car that afternoon to get shats for the hog pen of Ollie Hitchens, who [...] gave Dryden a dollar for his services in getting the shats [...] some pine shats for his father.
    • 2012, Rob Wilgus, Sickle, Trafford Publishing (→ISBN), page 225:
      A small, well known, pine shat covered path pushed between two rows of trees.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bruce L. Derwing, Royal Skousen, Productivity and the English Past Tense, in The Reality of Linguistic Rules, page 202
  2. ^ Survival of the Strongest, in Studies in the History of the English Language V (2010, →ISBN, page 101: What may come as a surprise, depending on the framework in which one operates, is that sit must have been largely responsible for the preterite shat of shit and probably the preterite spat of spit. Shit should conjugate shite~shote, and spit was originally weak (OED).
  3. ^ Harper, Douglas (2001), “Etymology Online Dictionary: 'shit'”, in Etymology Online Dictionary[1], Douglas Harper, retrieved 2009-04-13
  4. ^ The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1914
  5. ^ J. A. Cope of the Maryland State Department of Forestry, Loblolly Pine in Maryland: A Handbook for Growers and Users (1923), page 3: [...] so it frequently gets the designation of long-leaf pine, or long-needled pine, or more commonly, especially in Somerset County "long-shat pine" — shat, or shattle, being an obsolete word for needle.
  6. ^ Ella C. Emery of the Delaware Commission for Conservation of Forests, ‎Report of Commission for the Conservation of Forests in Delaware (1926), page 27: The needles of this pine are from 6 to 8 inches long and for that reason, in the regions where it abounds, it is often called long shat pine; that being an abbreviation or contraction of the obsolete word shattle, meaning needle. It is so termed as a matter of distinguishing it from scrub pine ...
  7. ^ Theophilus Tunis, Forestry for Profit: How the Woodlot Can be Made to Pay (1923), page 72: An artificial planting of loblolly pine I knew forty years ago, planted for a convenient or near-by supply of pine needles known in various localities by the various names of pine shats or shatters, pine straw or litter, [...]

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *śaktā, from Proto-Indo-European *sē̆k (to cut). Cognate to Latin secula (sickle), sacena (pick-axe of the pontifix).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

shat m (indefinite plural shata)

  1. heart-shaped hoe, mattock

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.358

HausaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English shirt

NounEdit

shât f

  1. shirt

KriolEdit

EtymologyEdit

English shot

NounEdit

shat

  1. attempt