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See also: SPIT

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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Greek soldiers roasting lambs for Easter using spits (sense 1) in 1958
A spit as a landform (sense 2): an aerial photograph of Farewell Spit at the northern tip of the South Island of New Zealand

Etymology 1Edit

The noun is from Middle English spit, spite, spete, spette, spyte, spytte (rod on which meat is cooked; rod used as a torture instrument; short spear; point of a spear; spine in the fin of a fish; pointed object; dagger symbol; land projecting into the sea), from Old English spitu (rod on which meat is cooked; spit),[1] from Proto-Germanic *spitō (rod; skewer; spike), *spituz (rod on which meat is cooked; stick), from Proto-Indo-European *spid-, *spey- (sharp; sharp stick). The English word is cognate with Danish spid, Dutch spit, German Low German Spitt (pike, spear; spike; skewer; spit), Swedish spett (skewer; spit; type of crowbar).

The verb is derived from the noun,[2] or from Middle English spiten (to put on a spit; to impale), from spit, spite: see above.[3] The English word is cognate with Middle Dutch speten, spitten (modern Dutch speten), Middle Low German speten (Low German spitten, modern German spießen (to skewer, to spear), spissen (now dialectal)).[2]

NounEdit

spit (plural spits)

  1. A thin metal or wooden rod on which meat is skewered for cooking, often over a fire.
    Synonym: broach
  2. A generally low, narrow, pointed, usually sandy peninsula.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spit (third-person singular simple present spits, present participle spitting, simple past and past participle spitted)

  1. (transitive) To impale on a spit; to pierce with a sharp object.
    to spit a loin of veal
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iii], page 79, column 1:
      [W]hy in a moment looke to ſee / The blind and bloody Souldier, with foule hand / Deſire the Locks of your ſhrill-ſhriking Daughters: / Your Fathers taken by the ſiluer Bears, / And their moſt reuerend Heads daſht to the Walls: / Your naked Infants ſpitted vpon Pykes, / Whiles the mad Mothers, with their howles confus'd, / Doe breake the Clouds, [] / What ſay you? Will you yeeld, and thus auoyd? / Or guiltie in defence, be thus destroy'd.
  2. (transitive) To use a spit to cook; to attend to food that is cooking on a spit.
    She’s spitting the roast in the kitchen.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

The verb is from Middle English spē̆ten, spete (to spit (blood, phlegm, saliva, venom, etc.); of a fire: to emit sparks), from Old English spǣtan (to spit; to squirt);[4] or from Middle English spit, spitte, spitten (to spit (blood, phlegm, saliva, venom, etc.); of a fire: to emit sparks), from Old English spittan, sypttan (to spit),[5][6] both from Proto-Germanic, from Proto-Indo-European *sp(y)ēw, *spyū,[7] ultimately imitative; compare Middle English spitelen (to spit out, expectorate)[8] and English spew.[9] The English word is cognate with Danish spytte (to spit), North Frisian spütte, Norwegian spytte (to spit), Swedish spotta (to spit), Old Norse spýta (Faroese spýta (to spit), Icelandic spýta (to spit)).[6]

The noun is derived from the verb;[10] compare Danish spyt (spit), Middle English spit, spitte (saliva, spittle, sputum),[11] spet (saliva, spittle),[12] spē̆tel (saliva, spittle),[13] North Frisian spiit.[10]

VerbEdit

spit (third-person singular simple present spits, present participle spitting, simple past and past participle spat or spit)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To evacuate (saliva or another substance) from the mouth, etc.
    Synonym: expectorate
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To emit or expel in a manner similar to evacuating saliva from the mouth; specifically, to rain or snow slightly.
    a hot pan spitting droplets of fat
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To utter (something) violently.
  4. (transitive, slang, hip-hop) To rap, to utter.
Usage notesEdit

The past tense and past participle spit is an older form, but remains the more common form used by speakers in North America, and is also used often enough by speakers of British and Commonwealth English to be listed as an alternative form by the Collins English Dictionary and OxfordDictionaries.com. A non-standard past participle form is spitten.

Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from spit (verb)
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

spit (countable and uncountable, plural spits)

  1. (uncountable) Saliva, especially when expectorated.
    Synonyms: expectoration, spittle
    There was spit all over the washbasin.
  2. (countable) An instance of spitting; specifically, a light fall of rain or snow.
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from spit (noun)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 3Edit

The noun is from Middle Dutch speet, spit, Middle Low German spêdt, spit (Low German spit); the word is cognate with Dutch spit, North Frisian spatt, spet, West Frisian spit.[14]

The verb is from Middle English spitten (to dig), from Old English spittan (to dig with a spade),[15] possibly from spitu (rod on which meat is cooked; spit); see further at etymology 1. The English word is cognate with Middle Dutch spetten, spitten (modern Dutch spitten), Middle Low German speten, spitten (Low German spitten), North Frisian spat, West Frisian spitte.[16]

NounEdit

spit (plural spits)

  1. The depth to which the blade of a spade goes into the soil when it is used for digging; a layer of soil of the depth of a spade's blade.
    • [1847, James Orchard Halliwell, “SPIT”, in A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs, and Ancient Customs, from the Fourteenth Century. [...] In Two Volumes, volume II (J–Z), London: John Russell Smith, [], OCLC 1008510154, page 785, column 1:
      SPIT. (1) The depth a spade goes in digging, about a foot.]
  2. The amount of soil that a spade holds; a spadeful.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spit (third-person singular simple present spits, present participle spitting, simple past and past participle spitted)

  1. (transitive, dialectal) To dig (something) using a spade; also, to turn (the soil) using a plough.
  2. (transitive, dialectal) To plant (something) using a spade.
  3. (intransitive, dialectal) To dig, to spade.
    Synonym: delve
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ spit(e, n.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019; compare “spit, n.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1914, and “spit” (US) / “spit” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.
  2. 2.0 2.1 spit, v.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1914.
  3. ^ spiten, v.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019.
  4. ^ spē̆ten, v.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019.
  5. ^ spitten, v.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 21 March 2019.
  6. 6.0 6.1 spit, v.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1914.
  7. ^ John Ayto (1990) Dictionary of Word Origins, New York, N.Y.: Arcade Publishing, →ISBN.
  8. ^ spitelen, v.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019, derived from Middle English spitten.
  9. ^ spit” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.
  10. 10.0 10.1 spit, n.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1914.
  11. ^ spit(te, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019, derived from spitten (to spit).
  12. ^ spet, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019, derived from spē̆ten (to spit).
  13. ^ spē̆tel, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019.
  14. ^ spit, n.3”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1914.
  15. ^ spitten, v.(2)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 21 March 2019.
  16. ^ spit, v.3”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1914.

AnagramsEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English speed.

NounEdit

spit

  1. speed

WestrobothnianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German spīt. Compare Old Norse spé, Norwegian spit, English spite, Dutch spijt. See also spej.

NounEdit

spit m

  1. Spite, defiance.
    Han åt int na i spit’n
    In defiance he ate nothing.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse *spítr, from Proto-Germanic *spihtiz. Cognate with Old Norse spéttr, spætr, from *spihtaz, *spehtaz. Compare riit from *rihtijaną and witer from *wihtiz.

NounEdit

spit m

  1. (in compounds) Woodpecker.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

spit m

  1. Capacity.
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit