Open main menu
See also: Hast, hást, häst, and has't

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the verb have. Compare German and West Frisian hast.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hæst/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æst

VerbEdit

hast

  1. (archaic) second-person singular simple present form of have
    Thou hast lovely eyes!
    Thou hast left me alone.
    Thou hast made me endless... -Ravindranath Thakur, Song Offerings, Poem 1

Usage notesEdit

  • Hast is the original second-person singular present tense of to have and is now largely archaic, having been superseded by have. It is still however found in poetry and older works, being used both as a main verb and an auxiliary verb, and is occasionally still heard in certain regional dialects, especially in the north of England. It is perhaps most familiar to modern ears through its extensive use in the Book of Common Prayer of 1662 and the Authorised Version of the Bible, and in other liturgical texts derived from, or influenced by, them. It corresponds to the familiar second-person singular present tense of to have in some other European languages.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

NounEdit

hast m

  1. haste

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German hast, from Old French haste.

NounEdit

hast c (singular definite hasten, not used in plural form)

  1. haste

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

hast

  1. imperative of haste

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hast

  1. Second-person singular present of haben.

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hast c

  1. hurry, haste

DeclensionEdit

Declension of hast 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative hast hasten
Genitive hasts hastens

See alsoEdit


West FrisianEdit

VerbEdit

hast

  1. Second-person informal singular of hawwe

NounEdit

hast

  1. haste

AdverbEdit

hast

  1. almost, nearly